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All Forums > WHATS ON YOUR MIND > ALL OTHER SHIT > OBITS
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 2:25 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Phil Everly of harmony duo the Everly Brothers dies at 74





LOS ANGELES — Phil Everly, who with his brother Don formed an influential harmony duo that touched the hearts and sparked the imaginations of rock ‘n’ roll singers for decades, including the Beatles and Bob Dylan, died Friday. He was 74.

Everly died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at a Burbank hospital, said his son Jason Everly.

Phil and Don Everly helped draw the blueprint of rock ‘n’ roll in the late 1950s and 1960s with a high harmony that captured the yearning and angst of a nation of teenage baby boomers looking for a way to express themselves beyond the simple platitudes of the pop music of the day.

The Beatles, early in their career, once referred to themselves as “the English Everly Brothers.” And Bob Dylan once said, “We owe these guys everything. They started it all.”

The Everlys’ hit records included the then-titilating “Wake Up Little Susie” and the universally identifiable “Bye Bye Love,” each featuring their twined voices with lyrics that mirrored the fatalism of country music and a rocking backbeat that more upbeat pop. These sounds and ideas would be warped by their devotees into a new kind of music that would ricochet around the world.

In all, their career spanned five decades, although they performed separately from 1973 to 1983. In their heyday between 1957 and 1962, they had 19 top 40 hits.

The two broke up amid quarrelling in 1973 after 16 years of hits, then reunited in 1983, “sealing it with a hug,” Phil Everly said.

Although their number of hit records declined in the late 1980s, they made successful concert tours in this country and Europe.

They were inducted into the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame in 1986, the same year they had a hit pop-country record, “Born Yesterday.”

Don Everly was born in 1937 in Brownie, Ky., to Ike and Margaret Everly, who were folk and country music singers. Phil Everly was born to the couple on Jan. 19, 1939, in Chicago where the Everlys moved to from Brownie when Ike grew tired of working in the coal mines.

The brothers began singing country music in 1945 on their family’s radio show in Shenandoah, Iowa.

Their career breakthrough came when they moved to Nashville in the mid-1950s and signed a recording contract with New York-based Cadence Records.

Their breakup came dramatically during a concert at Knott’s Berry Farm in California. Phil Everly threw his guitar down and walked off, prompting Don Everly to tell the crowd, “The Everly Brothers died 10 years ago.”

During their breakup, they pursued solo singing careers with little fanfare. Phil also appeared in the Clint Eastwood movie “Every Which Way but Loose.” Don made a couple of records with friends in Nashville, performed in local nightclubs and played guitar and sang background vocals on recording sessions.

Don Everly said in a 1986 Associated Press interview that the two were successful because “we never followed trends. We did what we liked and followed our instincts. Rock ‘n’ roll did survive, and we were right about that. Country did survive, and we were right about that. You can mix the two but people said we couldn’t.”

In 1988, the brothers began hosting an annual homecoming benefit concert in Central City, Ky., to raise money for the area.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 8:30 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Say it ain't so!

[youtube]xCWMMKS6W4Q[/youtube]

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 3:58 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Russell Johnson, the Professor on 'Gilligan's Island,' Is Dead at 89



Russell Johnson, the actor whose genius Professor Roy Hinkley was always one coconut away from inventing a way off "Gilligan’s Island," has died of natural causes. He was 89.

Dawn Wells, who played fellow castaway Mary Ann, said her friend passed away this morning after being in hospice for a short period of time.

"Russell was 100 percent a gentleman," she told "The Insider." "A genuine, dear, wonderful man."

Before his three-hour tour took a bad a turn, Johnson was a player in 1950s science-fiction classics "This Island Earth" and "It Came From Outer Space." He also scored two appearances on "The Twilight Zone" and acted opposite Ronald Reagan in the 1953 western "Law and Order."

Prior to acting, Johnson served in the Army Air Corps during World War II. He earned a Purple Heart when his plane was shot down over the Philippines in 1945.

Johnson was married three times, most recently to actress Constance Dane.

Speaking to Yahoo TV, Johnson's agent Mike Eisenstadt had fond memories of the small-screen star. "Great guy, very respectful, he loved his family," said Eisenstadt, who also represented Wells, Denver, and Tina "Ginger" Louise. The agent called the classically trained Johnson a "very positive guy" who loved his fans but chose to live away from Hollywood in Washington state. "He didn't want to be in that scene," he said.

TV Land, which was already planning to add "Gilligan's Island" reruns to its lineup on Monday, offered condolences in a statement from president Larry W. Jones: "We are deeply saddened to have learned of the passing of Russell Johnson, the beloved 'Professor.' We extend our deepest condolences to his family. ‘Gilligan's Island’ is one of the most iconic television series in pop culture history. The news about Russell makes its return to TV Land on Monday all the more meaningful.”

As word of his death spread, those fans flocked to Twitter to pay tribute to the TV icon.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 3:02 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Iconic folk singer and activist Pete Seeger dead at 94


Pete Seeger performs in a concert in East Berlin, East Germany, in 1967.

Pete Seeger, the iconic banjo-strumming folk singer and activist who performed for migrant workers and presidents, died on Monday. He was 94.

Seeger, whose songwriting credits included "If I Had a Hammer," "Turn, Turn, Turn," and "Where Have All the Flowers Gone," died of natural causes in a New York City hospital, his grandson Kitama Cahill-Jackson confirmed to NBC News early Tuesday.

“He thought everyone could be heroic,” Seeger's grandson said. “He got the world to sing. I think he was a role model to his family, to the whole world.”

As a member of the Communist Party in the 1940s, Seeger's skepticism of those in power carried through his career. He was a longtime supporter of the labor movement, and supported the civil rights and anti-Vietnam War movements. Seeger was also convicted of contempt of Congress after refusing to answer questions at the House Un-American Activities Committee.

"Be wary of great leaders," he told The Associated Press after a 2011 Manhattan Occupy march. "Hope that there are many, many small leaders."

Nevertheless, he performed for presidents as well, including at a concert marking President Barack Obama’s inauguration in 2009.

President Bill Clinton hailed him as "an inconvenient artist who dared to sing things as he saw them."

Seeger was born on May 3, 1919, to an artistic family in New York City. He dropped out of Harvard and took to the road in 1938.

"The sociology professor said, 'Don't think that you can change the world. The only thing you can do is study it,'" Seeger said in October 2011, according to the AP.

Seeger was credited with popularizing what became the anthem for the civil rights movement, "We Shall Overcome," although he said his contribution to the actual song was minimal.

In 1996, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Ten years later, Bruce Springsteen honored him with "We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions," a rollicking reinterpretation of songs sung by Seeger.

"Every kid who ever sat around a campfire singing an old song is indebted in some way to Pete Seeger," fellow folk singer Arlo Guthrie, son of Woody Guthrie, told the AP.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 2014 7:15 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Philip Seymour Hoffman found dead with needle in arm



Oscar-winning actor Philip Seymour Hoffman was found dead of an
apparent drug overdose — in the bathroom with a hypodermic

needle still in his arm — inside a Greenwich Village home on Sunday morning, cops said.

A personal assistant found Hoffman’s body in an apartment at 35 Bethune St. and called 911 around 11:30 a.m, sources said.

Cops are at the scene and are investigating, sources said.

Hoffman, 46, publicly admitted in 2006 that he nearly succumbed to substance abuse after graduating from NYU’s drama school, but got sober in rehab.

“It was all that (drugs and alcohol), yeah. It was anything I could get my hands on…I liked it all,” he told “60 Minutes” as the time.

Last year, Hoffman reportedly checked himself into rehab again for ten days after relapsing in 2012.

TMZ said he began using prescription pills, then snorted heroin for about a week before realizing he needed help.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 5:09 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

wow Hoffman was a very good actor..I have seen many of his movies..he played some good roles....terrible another good actor dies from drugs...
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 9:23 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

SHIRLEY TEMPLE

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 9:25 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

SID CEASAR



The comic legend was at home in L.A. He was 91.



Sad news: One of television's original comic stars, Sid Caesar, has died. He was 91 and at home in Los Angeles, according to his friend and former collaborator, Carl Reiner, reports Reuters.

His biographer and friend, Eddy Friedfeld, confirmed the news to the Los Angeles Times. Friedfeld told the paper Caesar died after a brief illness.

Caesar broke TV ground with his now-classic sketch series, Your Show of Shows, which co-starred Imogene Coca and Reiner and ran on NBC from 1950-54. Caesar's Hour followed and ran through 1957.

Caesar charmed later generations with his turn has the rangy, lovable Coach Calhoun in the Grease movies.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 19, 2014 7:38 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Nelson Frazier Jr., WWE's Mabel, Viscera and Big Daddy V, dies at 43




By Houston Mitchell

February 19, 2014, 7:45 a.m.

Nelson Frazier, who wrestled in WWE under the names Mabel, Viscera and Big Daddy V, died after an apparent heart attack at the age of 43, WWE is reporting.

Frazier joined WWE as Mabel, one-half of the "Men on a Mission" tag team, before morphing into Viscera, a member of the Undertaker's "Ministry of Darkness," in 1999. He later changed his name to Big Daddy V.

Multiple wrestlers and people associated with wrestling have tweeted their reaction to Frazier's death:

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2014 8:36 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Harold Ramis Dead -- 'Ghostbusters' Legend Dies at 69




Hollywood legend Harold Ramis -- famous for his films "Caddyshack," "Ghostbusters," "Groundhog Day," and "Animal House" -- has died.

According to his family, the writer-director passed away early this morning at his Chicago home from complications stemming from autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis, a rare disease involving the swelling of blood vessels. He was surrounded by his family.

Ramis was 69. He is survived by his wife Erica, his sons Julian and Daniel, his daughter Violet, and two grandchildren.

Ramis began suffering from health issues related to his autoimmune disease in 2010.

In addition to "Caddyshack" and others, the comedy legend directed "National Lampoon's Vacation," "Analyze This" and several other films. He also wrote sequels to his films, like "Ghostbusters 2" and "Caddyshack 2."

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2014 8:47 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Jim Lange, 'The Dating Game' host, dies at 81



SAN FRANCISCO – Jim Lange, the first host of the popular game show "The Dating Game," has died at his home in Mill Valley, Calif. He was 81.

He died Tuesday morning after suffering a heart attack, his wife Nancy told The Associated Press Wednesday.

Though Lange had a successful career in radio, he is best known for his television role on ABC's "The Dating Game," which debuted in 1965 and on which he appeared for more than a decade, charming audiences with his mellifluous voice and wide, easygoing grin.

He also played host to many celebrity guests. Michael Jackson, Steve Martin and Arnold Schwarzenegger, among others, appeared as contestants.

Even a pre-"Charlie's Angels" Farrah Fawcett appeared on the program, introduced as "an accomplished artist and sculptress" with a dream to open her own gallery.

The show's format: a young man or woman questions three members of the opposite sex, hidden from view, to determine which one would be the best date.

The questions were designed by the show's writers to elicit sexy answers.

"I've never been out on a date before. What do two kids like us do on a date?" a teenage Michael Jackson asked one of his potential dates on a 1972 episode of the show.

"Well, we'd have fun," the girl answered. "We'd go out to dinner, and then I'd go over to your house."

Lange was born on Aug. 15, 1932, in St. Paul, Minn., where at 15 he discovered a passion for local radio after winning an audition at a local station.

"They wanted a boy and a girl," he said in a 1992 interview with the Bay Area Radio Digest. "They wanted the boy to do sports and the girl to do the dances and stuff that was going on in the Twin Cities -- very sexist -- and play music once a week."

He hosted that show for two years before attending the University of Minnesota and doing a three-year stint in the Marines, according to the Bay Area Radio Museum.

His big break on network TV came in 1962 when he was made an announcer and sidekick on "The Tennessee Ernie Ford Show."

Later, after "The Dating Game" brought him national recognition, he also hosted the game shows "Hollywood Connection," "$100,000 Name That Tune" and "The New Newlywed Game."

Lang also worked as a disc jockey for decades in Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area, and upon his retirement from broadcasting in 2005, he was the morning DJ for KABL-FM, which specializes in playing classics from the Big Band era to the 1970s.

"As much as he's known for his television work, his real love was radio," his wife said. "He loved doing local radio, especially before it was computerized."

Lange himself once told the Bay Area Radio Digest that his favorite aspect of the medium was that "you don't have to worry about lighting directors and cameramen or script writers and all that."

"Good radio is still the most fun," he said, "It always will be. Plus, you don't have to wear makeup and you don't have to shave."

Lange is survived by a sister, five children, two stepchildren and four grandchildren.

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2014 12:49 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Tonight Show’ Favorite, Comedian David Brenner Dies At 78



NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — Comedian David Brenner passed away Saturday, a spokesman for his family said. He was 78.

Jeff Abraham, who was Brenner’s publicist, said the “Tonight Show” favorite died Saturday afternoon at his home in New York City.
play


The gangly, toothy Brenner made more than 150 appearances as a guest and substitute host on Johnny Carson’s “Tonight Show,” starting in the 1970s.

The exposure turned the former documentary filmmaker into a hot comedian.

Brenner was a regular on other TV talk shows and game shows and starred in four HBO comedy specials. He also briefly hosted his own syndicated talk show in 1987.

Howard Stern tweeted about Brenner Saturday following the news of his passing, saying “Keep David in your thoughts. Great guy who was always encouraging and in my corner. I am so sad.”

Brenner continued to work steadily doing standup shows. A four-day gig last December included a New Year’s Eve show at a casino-resort in King of Prussia, Pa.

He’s also credited with inspiring the careers of the likes of Jerry Seinfeld and Richard Lewis, 1010 WINS’ Gary Baumgarten reported.

“He’s one of the first really standup comedians performing in comedy clubs. It wasn’t really around back in the day,” said Scott, an employee at Caroline’s Comedy Club and a standup comedian himself.

Brenner had been battling cancer and died peacefully at his home, Baumgarten reported.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2014 2:00 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS



Mickey Rooney, the pint-size, precocious actor and all-around talent whose more than 90-year career spanned silent comedies, Shakespeare, Judy Garland musicals, Andy Hardy stardom, television and the Broadway theater, died Sunday at age 93.

Los Angeles Police Commander Andrew Smith said that Rooney was with his family when he died at his North Hollywood home.

Smith said police took a death report but indicated that there was nothing suspicious and it was not a police case. He said he had no additional details on the circumstances of his passing.

Rooney started his career in his parents' vaudeville act while still a toddler, and broke into movies before age 10. He was still racking up film and TV credits more than 80 years later — a tenure likely unmatched in the history of show business.

"I always say, 'Don't retire — inspire,'" he told The Associated Press in March 2008. "There's a lot to be done."

Among his roles in recent years was a part as a guard in the smash 2006 comedy A Night at the Museum.

Rooney won two special Academy Awards for his film achievements, and reigned from 1939 to 1942 as the No. 1 moneymaking star in movies, his run only broken when he joined the Army. At his peak, he was the incarnation of the show biz lifer, a shameless ham and hoofer whom one could imagine singing, dancing and wisecracking in his crib, his blond hair, big grin and constant motion a draw for millions. He later won an Emmy and was nominated for a Tony.

"Mickey Rooney, to me, is the closest thing to a genius I ever worked with," Clarence Brown, who directed his Oscar-nominated performance in The Human Comedy, once said.

Rooney's personal life matched his film roles for color. His first wife was the glamorous — and taller — Ava Gardner, and he married seven more times, fathering seven sons and four daughters.

Through divorces, money problems and career droughts, he kept returning with customary vigor.

"I've been coming back like a rubber ball for years," he commented in 1979, the year he returned with a character role in The Black Stallion, drawing an Oscar nomination as supporting actor, one of four nominations he earned over the years.

That same year he starred with Ann Miller in a revue called Sugar Babies, a hokey mixture of vaudeville and burlesque. It opened in New York in October 1979, and immediately became Broadway's hottest ticket. Rooney received a Tony nomination (as did Miller) and earned millions during his years with the show.

To the end, he was a non-stop talker continually proposing enterprises, some accomplished, some just talk: a chain of barbecue stands; training schools for talented youngsters; a Broadway show he wrote about himself and Judy Garland; screenplays, novels, plays.
Mickey Rooney and wife Ava Gardner in January 1942.

Mickey Rooney and wife Ava Gardner in January 1942.
AP/File

Rooney was among the last survivors of Hollywood's studio era, which his career predated. Rooney signed a contract with MGM in 1934 and landed his first big role as Clark Gable as a boy in Manhattan Melodrama. A loanout to Warner Bros. brought him praise as an exuberant Puck in Max Reinhardt's 1935 production of A Midsummer Night's Dream, which also featured James Cagney and a young Olivia de Havilland.

Rooney was soon earning $300 a week with featured roles in such films as Riff Raff, Little Lord Fauntleroy, Captains Courageous, The Devil Is a Sissy, and most notably, as a brat humbled by Spencer Tracy's Father Flanagan in Boys Town.

The big break came with the wildly popular Andy Hardy series, beginning with A Family Affair.

"I knew A Family Affair was a B picture, but that didn't stop me from putting my all in it," Rooney wrote. "A funny thing happened to this little programmer: released in April 1937, it ended up grossing more than half a million dollars nationwide."

The critics grimaced at the depiction of a kindly small-town judge (Lionel Barrymore) with his character-building homilies to his obstreperous son. But MGM saw the film as a good template for a series and studio head Louis B. Mayer saw the series as a template for a model American home. With Barrymore replaced by Lewis Stone in subsequent films and Rooney's part built up, Andy Hardy became a national hero and the 15 Hardy movies became a gold mine.

Rooney's peppy, all-American charm was never better matched than when he appeared opposite his friend and fellow child star Garland in such films as Babes on Broadway and Strike up the Band, musicals built around a plot of "Let's put on a show!" One of them, the 1939 Babes in Arms, brought him his first Oscar nomination. He was also in such dramas as The Human Comedy, 1943, which gained Rooney his second Oscar nomination as best actor, and National Velvet, 1944, with Elizabeth Taylor.

But Rooney became a cautionary tale for early fame. He earned a reputation for drunken escapades and quickie romances and was unlucky in both money and love. In 1942 he married for the first time, to Gardner, the statuesque MGM beauty. He was 21, she was 19.

"I'm 5 feet 3, but I was 6 feet 4 when I married Ava," he said in later years. The marriage ended in a year, and Rooney joined the Army in 1943, spending most of his World War II service entertaining troops.

Rooney returned to Hollywood and disillusionment. His savings had been stolen by a manager and his career was in a nose dive. He made two films at MGM, then his contract was dropped.

"I began to realize how few friends everyone has," he wrote in his second autobiography. "All those Hollywood friends I had in 1938, 1939, 1940 and 1941, when I was the toast of the world, weren't friends at all."

His movie career never regained its prewar eminence. The Bold and the Brave, 1956 World War II drama, brought him an Oscar nomination as best supporting actor. But mostly, he played second leads in such films as Off Limits with Bob Hope, The Bridges at Toko-Ri with William Holden, and Requiem for a Heavyweight with Anthony Quinn. In the early 1960s, he had a wild turn in Breakfast at Tiffany's as Audrey Hepburn's bucktoothed Japanese neighbor and was among the fortune seekers in the all-star comedy It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World.
Mickey Rooney performing at age seven.

Mickey Rooney performing at age seven.
AP

Rooney's starring roles came in low-budget films such as Drive a Crooked Road, The Atomic Kid, Platinum High School, The Twinkle in God's Eye and How to Stuff a Wild Bikini.

But his later career proved his resilience: The Oscar nomination for Black Stallion. The Sugar Babies hit that captivated New York, London, Las Vegas and major U.S. cities. Voicing animated features like The Fox and the Hound, The Care Bears Movie and Little Nemo. An Emmy for his portrayal of a disturbed man in the 1981 TV movie Bill. Teaming with his eighth wife, Jan, off-Broadway in 2004 for a musical look back at his career called, fittingly, Let's Put On a Show.

Over the years, Rooney also made hundreds of appearances on TV talk and game shows, dramas and variety programs. He starred in three series: The Mickey Rooney Show (1954), Mickey (1964) and One of the Boys (1982). All lasted one season and a co-star from One of the Boys, Dana Carvey, later parodied Rooney on Saturday Night Live, mocking him as a hopeless egomaniac who couldn't stop boasting he once was "the number one star ... IN THE WOOORLD!"

In 1983, the Motion Picture Academy presented Rooney with an honorary Oscar for his "60 years of versatility in a variety of memorable film performances." That matched the 1938 special award he shared with Deanna Durbin for "bringing to the screen the spirit and personification of youth."

A lifelong storyteller, Rooney wrote two memoirs: i.e., an Autobiography published in 1965; Life Is Too Short, 1991. He also produced a novel about a child movie star, The Search for Sonny Skies, in 1994.

In the autobiographies, Rooney gave two versions of his debut in show business. First he told of being 1½ and climbing into the orchestra pit of the burlesque theater where his parents were appearing. He sat on a kettle drum and pretended to be playing his whistle, vastly amusing the audience. The theater owner kept him in the show.

The second autobiography told a different story: He was hiding under the scenery when he sneezed. Dragged out by an actor, the toddler was ordered to play his harmonica. He did, and the crowd loved it.

Whatever the introduction, Joe Yule Jr., born in 1920, was the star of his parents' act by the age of 2, singing "Sweet Rosie O'Grady" in a tiny tuxedo. His father was a baggy-pants comic, Joe Yule, his mother a dancer, Nell Carter. Yule was a boozing Scotsman with a wandering eye, and the couple soon parted.

While his mother danced in the chorus, young Joe was wowing audiences with his heartfelt rendition of "Pal o' My Cradle Days." During a tour to California, the boy made his film debut as a midget in a 1926 Fox short, Not to Be Trusted.

Young Joe Yule played another midget in a Warner Bros. feature, Orchids and Ermine starring Colleen Moore. Then he tried out for the lead in a series of Mickey McGuire comedies, meant to rival Hal Roach's Our Gang.

"I was ready to be Mickey McGuire," Rooney wrote in his memoirs, "except for one thing: his hair was black, mine was blonde."

His mother dyed his hair black the night before the audition, and her son won the role. He also acquired a new name: Mickey McGuire. He starred in 21 of the silent comedies, 42 with sound.

The boy was also playing kid parts in features, and his name seemed inappropriate. His mother suggested Rooney, after the vaudeville dancer, Pat Rooney.

After splitting with Gardner, Rooney married Betty Jane Rase, Miss Birmingham of 1944, whom he had met during military training in Alabama. They had two sons and divorced after four years. (Their son Timothy died in September 2006 at age 59 after a battle with a muscle disease called dermatomyositis.)

His third and fourth marriages were to actress Martha Vickers (one son) and model Elaine Mahnken.

The fifth Mrs. Rooney, model Barbara Thomason, gave birth to four children. While the couple were estranged in 1966, she was found shot to death in her Brentwood home; beside her was the body of her alleged lover, a Yugoslavian actor. It was an apparent murder and suicide.

A year later, Rooney began a three-month marriage to Margaret Lane. She was followed by a secretary, Caroline Hockett — another divorce after five years and one daughter.

In 1978, Rooney, 57, married for the eighth — and apparently last — time. His bride was singer Janice Darlene Chamberlain, 39. Their marriage lasted longer than the first seven combined.

After a lifetime of carrying on, he became a devoted Christian and member of the Church of Religious Science. He settled in suburban Thousand Oaks, about 40 miles west of Los Angeles. In 2011, Rooney was in the news again when he testified before Congress about abuse of the elderly, alleging that he was left powerless by a family member who took and misused his money.

"I felt trapped, scared, used and frustrated," Rooney told a special Senate committee considering legislation to curb abuses of senior citizens. "But above all, when a man feels helpless, it's terrible."

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2014 2:23 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

‘Seinfeld’ actor John Pinette, 50, dies in Pittsburgh hotel
The standup comedian and actor died of liver and heart disease. Pinette guest starred as Howie in the series finale of ‘Seinfeld.’





John Pinette, the chubby stand-up comedian who portrayed a hapless carjacking victim in the final episode of "Seinfeld," has died. He was 50.

Pinette died of natural causes Saturday at a hotel in Pittsburgh, the Allegheny County Medical Examiner's office said Sunday evening. Pinette's agent confirmed his death.

The portly Pinette was a self-deprecating presence on stage, frequently discussing his weight on stand-up specials "Show Me the Buffett," "I'm Starvin'!" and "Still Hungry."

Pinette had been working on another stand-up project when he died, his agent, Nick Nuciforo, said.

"He should be celebrated for the amazing comedian he was," Nuciforo said.

The Boston native appeared in movies including "The Punisher" and had a trio of stand-up shows released on DVD but was perhaps best known as the portly carjacking victim whose plight lands the "Seinfeld" stars before a judge for failing to help under a "good Samaritan" law. Pinette also appeared in the television series "Parker Lewis Can't Lose."

Pinette also appeared on state in a national tour of "Hairspray" as Edna Turnblad, the mother of the play's heroine.

The medical examiner's office said no autopsy was performed and Pinette's own physician signed off on the cause of death.

Pinette had been preparing for a stand-up tour of the U.S. and Canada, Nuciforo said.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 09, 2014 1:58 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

9:52 PM PT -- Officials tell TMZ ... Warrior collapsed outside an Arizona hotel at 5:50 PM on April 8th ... while walking to his car with his wife.

Warrior was transported to a nearby hospital ... where he was pronounced dead.
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The Ultimate Warrior has died ... this according to the WWE.

Warrior -- real name James Hellwig -- was a true WWE legend ... and was one of the most iconic wrestlers of all time. He was 54-years-old.

Warrior was just inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame the night before Wrestlemania XXX this weekend ... and last night, he made his first appearance on "Monday Night Raw" in years.

WWE posted a message on the official website saying, "WWE is shocked and deeply saddened to learn of the passing of one of the most iconic WWE Superstars ever, The Ultimate Warrior. "

"Warrior began his WWE career in 1987 and quickly went on to become one of the biggest stars in WWE history. Warrior became WWE Champion at WrestleMania VI, defeating Hulk Hogan in an epic encounter. We are grateful that just days ago, Warrior had the opportunity to take his rightful place in the WWE Hall of Fame and was also able to appear at WrestleMania 30 and Monday Night Raw to address his legions of fans."

"WWE sends its sincere condolences to Warrior’s family, friends and fans. Warrior was 54 and is survived by his wife Dana and his two daughters."

[youtube]xR08M6EUd0g[/youtube]

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 17, 2014 1:51 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Blues legend Johnny Winter dies in Switzerland



Guitarist, singer and music producer Johnny Winter has died at age 70.

Winter rose to fame in the late 1960s and '70s with his performances and recordings that included producing his childhood hero Muddy Waters.

"I love blues. I don't mind a little rock and roll, too, as long as it's blues-based rock and roll," he told Guitar World in 2010. He was the older brother of Edgar Winter — also a music legend.

Winter's representative, Carla Parisi, confirmed Thursday to the Associated Press that Winter died Wednesday in a hotel room in Zurich. A Facebook note says "his wife, family and bandmates were all saddened by the loss of one of the world's finest guitarists."

He had been on an extensive tour that took him to Europe for his last performance Saturday at the Lovely Days Festival in Wiesen, Austria. He performed in May at the annual Jazz Fest in New Orleans.

Winter, who was born in Beaumont, Texas, showed his gift for music at an early age. At 4, he played the clarinet. At 11, the ukulele. He and Edgar often appeared as a duo on children's TV shows and talent contests. Johnny formed his first band when he was 15 and was making records at 18.

But he battled health and substance abuse issues through the years.

In that Guitar World interview in 2010, he said, "I was not in the best shape for a while there. I was going through some really difficult personal issues, and I started taking prescription drugs to help with the problems on the advice of a doctor. But I ended up taking too many prescription drugs for too long. Combined with drinking, the adverse effects just got worse and worse."

But, he added at the time, "I feel great now."

Last month, in an interview with JournalStar.com, Winter, who released more than 25 albums in his career but never won a Grammy, was asked what he'd like his legacy to be.

He replied: "I just hope I'm remembered as a good blues musician."

Winter was scheduled to release a new studio album, Step Back, on Sept. 2 via Megaforce Records.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 18, 2014 6:13 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Andy Griffith, TV’s Lawman and Moral Compass, Dies at 86

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Andy Griffith from "The Andy Griffith Show." More Photos »
By DOUGLAS MARTIN
Published: July 3, 2012350 Comments
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Andy Griffith, an actor whose folksy Southern manner charmed audiences for more than 50 years on Broadway, in movies, on albums and especially on television — most notably as the small-town sheriff on the long-running situation comedy that bore his name — died on Tuesday at his home on Roanoke Island in North Carolina. He was 86.
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His death was confirmed by the Dare County sheriff, Doug Doughtie.

Mr. Griffith was already a star — on Broadway in “No Time for Sergeants” and in Hollywood in Elia Kazan’s film “A Face in the Crowd” — when “The Andy Griffith Show“ made its debut in the fall of 1960. And he delighted a later generation of television viewers in the 1980s and ’90s in the title role of the courtroom drama “Matlock.”

But his fame was never as great as it was in the 1960s, when he starred for eight years as Andy Taylor, the sagacious sheriff of the make-believe town of Mayberry, N.C. Every week he rode herd on a collection of eccentrics, among them his high-strung deputy, Barney Fife, and the simple-minded gas station attendant Gomer Pyle. Meanwhile, as a widower, Andy raised a young son, Opie, and often went fishing with him. “The Andy Griffith Show,” seen Monday nights on CBS, was No. 4 in the Nielsen ratings its first year and never fell below the Top 10. It was No. 1 in 1968, its last season. After the run ended with Episode No. 249, the show lived on in spinoff series, endless reruns and even Sunday school classes organized around its rustic moral lessons.

The show imagined a reassuring world of fishin’ holes, ice cream socials and rock-hard family values during a decade that grew progressively tumultuous. Its vision of rural simplicity (captured in its memorable theme song, whistled over the opening credits) was part of a TV trend that began with “The Real McCoys” on ABC in 1957 and later included “The Beverly Hillbillies,” “Petticoat Junction,” “Green Acres” and “Hee Haw.”

But by the late 1960s, the younger viewers networks prized were spurning corn pone, and Mr. Griffith had decided to leave after the 1966-67 season to make movies. CBS made a lucrative offer for him to do one more season, and “The Andy Griffith Show” became the No. 1 series in the 1967-68 season. But Mr. Griffith had decided to move on, and so had the times. “Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In,” with its one-liners about drugs and Vietnam, and “The Mod Squad,” about an integrated trio of undercover officers, were grabbing a new audience.

But the characters in “The Andy Griffith Show” — Barney (Don Knotts), Gomer (Jim Nabors), Opie (Ron Howard, who went on to fame as a movie director), Aunt Bee (Frances Bavier) and the rest, including Gomer’s cousin Goober Pyle (George Lindsey, who died in May) — have remained tantalizingly real to their fans, who continue to watch reruns on cable TV and online.

Andy Griffith was more complex than Andy Taylor, although the show was based on his hometown, Mount Airy, N.C. Before he fetched up in Mayberry, he was known for bringing authenticity to dark roles, beginning with the lead in “A Face in the Crowd,” in 1957, the story of a rough-hewn television personality who, in the clutches of his city-slicker handlers, becomes something of a megalomaniac.

From the 1970s to the 1990s, Mr. Griffith starred in no fewer than six movies with the words “murder” or “kill” in their titles. In 1983, in “Murder in Coweta County,” he played a chillingly wicked man who remains stone cold even as he is strapped into the electric chair.

Sheriff Taylor aside, Mr. Griffith was no happy rustic; he enjoyed life in Hollywood and knew his way around a wine list. His career was tightly controlled by a personal manager, Richard O. Linke.

“If there is ever a question about something, I will do what he wants me to do,” Mr. Griffith told The New York Times Magazine in 1970. “Had it not been for him, I would have gone down the toilet.”

Far from the gregarious Andy Taylor, Mr. Griffith was a loner and a worrier. He once hit a door in anger, and for two episodes of “The Andy Griffith Show” he had a bandaged hand (explained on the show as an injury Andy received while apprehending criminals).

But the show’s 35 million viewers would have been reassured to learn that even at the peak of his popularity, Mr. Griffith drove a Ford station wagon and bought his suits off the rack. He said his favorite honor was having a stretch of a North Carolina highway named after him in 2002. (That was before President George W. Bush presented him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2005.)

He was also gratified to find his character ranked No. 8 on TV Guide’s list of the “50 Greatest TV Dads of All Time” in 2004. (Bill Cosby’s Dr. Cliff Huxtable was No. 1.) But one honor denied him was an Emmy Award: he was nominated only once, for his role in the TV movie “Murder in Texas.” “The Andy Griffith Show” itself, though nominated three times, also never won an Emmy, but Mr. Knotts did — five times — for his performance as Deputy Fife, and so did Ms. Bavier, once, as Andy’s aunt.
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This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: July 9, 2012


Because of an editing error, an obituary on Wednesday about the actor Andy Griffith misidentified the television anthology series on which he starred in one episode, an adaptation of the novel “No Time for Sergeants,” in 1955, before playing the same role in the stage and film versions of the same story. The show was “The United States Steel Hour,” not “Playhouse 90.” And also because of an editing error, the obituary referred incorrectly to Mr. Griffith’s son, Andy Jr. (who died in 1996), and his daughter, Dixie Griffith. They were the children of his first marriage, not his third.

A version of this article appeared in print on July 4, 2012, on page A16 of the New York edition with the headline: Andy Griffith, TV’s Lawman and Moral Compass, Dies at 86.
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 18, 2014 10:56 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Gopher...you OK? He died 2 years ago!

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 20, 2014 1:33 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS



Actor James Garner, whose whimsical style in the 1950s TV Western "Maverick" led to a stellar career in TV and films such as "The Rockford Files" and his Oscar-nominated "Murphy's Romance," has died, police said. He was 86.

He was found dead of natural causes at his home in the Brentwood area of Los Angeles Saturday evening, Los Angeles police officer Alonzo Iniquez said early Sunday.

Police responded to a call around 8 p.m. PDT and confirmed Garner's identity from family members, Iniquez told The Associated Press.

There was no immediate word on a more specific cause of death. Garner had suffered a stroke in May 2008, just weeks after his 80th birthday.

Although he was adept at drama and action, Garner was best known for his low-key, wisecracking style, especially with his hit TV series, "Maverick" and "The Rockford Files."

His quick-witted avoidance of conflict provided a refreshingly new take on the American hero, contrasting with the steely heroics of John Wayne and the fast trigger of Clint Eastwood.

Well into his 70s, the handsome Oklahoman remained active in both TV and film. In 2002, he was Sandra Bullock's father in the film "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood." The following year, he joined the cast of "8 Simple Rules ... For Dating My Teenage Daughter," playing the grandfather on the sitcom after star John Ritter, who played the father, died during the show's second season.

When he received the Screen Actors Guild's lifetime achievement award in 2005, he quipped, "I'm not at all sure how I got here."

But in his 2011 memoir, "The Garner Files," he provided some amusing and enlightening clues, including his penchant for bluntly expressed opinions and a practice for decking people who said something nasty to his face — including an obnoxious fan and an abusive stepmother. They all deserved it, Garner declared in his book.

It was in 1957 when the ABC network, desperate to compete on ratings-rich Sunday night, scheduled "Maverick" against CBS's powerhouse "The Ed Sullivan Show" and NBC's "The Steve Allen Show." ''Maverick" soon outpolled them both.

At a time when the networks were crowded with hard-eyed, traditional Western heroes, Bret Maverick provided a fresh breath of air. With his sardonic tone and his eagerness to talk his way out of a squabble rather than pull out his six-shooter, the con-artist Westerner seemed to scoff at the genre's values.

After a couple of years, Garner felt the series was losing its creative edge, and he found a legal loophole to escape his contract in 1960.

His first film after "Maverick" established him as a movie actor. It was "The Children's Hour," William Wyler's remake of Lillian Hellman's lesbian drama that co-starred Audrey Hepburn and Shirley MacLaine.

He followed in a successful comedy with Kim Novak, "Boys Night Out," and then fully established his box-office appeal with the 1963 blockbuster war drama "The Great Escape" and two smash comedies with Doris Day — "The Thrill of It All" and "Move Over Darling."

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2014 12:44 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Actor Richard Kiel, 'Jaws' in Bond movies, dies in Fresno



Richard Kiel, the 7-foot-2-inch actor of Clovis who reached fame by playing the James Bond villain "Jaws," died Wednesday at Saint Agnes Medical Center in Fresno. He was 74.

Kiel's steel-toothed character appeared in the 1977 Bond film "The Spy Who Loved Me," as well as "Moonraker" in 1979. He also played Adam Sandler's boss in the 1996 comedy "Happy Gilmore."

His oldest son, Richard George Kiel, said his father had been recovering from a femur fracture and the exact cause of his death is still unclear. Kiel's family was in the process of trying to get him transferred to a rehabilitation facility when he died unexpectedly.

Kiel and his family lived in Coarsegold from 1980 to 2002 and had been Clovis residents since.

The younger Kiel said his father's favorite experience was acting in the James Bond movies because he got to travel all over the world for two years between filming and promotion. But family always came first.

"Most people just know him from his screen persona, but he was a very gentle and loving man," his son said. "During the heyday in the '80s he often would turn down roles because they were too gruesome (and) he didn't think they would be a good experience for us."

As he lay in his hospital bed trying to recuperate, Kiel's main concerns were his children and wife, his son said.

"That's certainly the thing I miss about him the most already," he said.

Kiel would have turned 75 on Sept. 13. His son said the family had rented a house on the coast for a week to celebrate when he broke his leg. Even then, he said, his father selflessly proposed that everyone stick to the plan.

Randy Davis, 55, of Hilmar, co-host of Fresno Collect-A-Con, said Kiel was truly a "gentle giant."

Davis said Kiel was a special guest at Collect-A-Con twice, most recently in April, where vendors gather to sell things like comic books, action figures and sports cards.

Kiel was scheduled to be the special guest at the next Collect-A-Con on Oct. 4 in Merced, Davis said.

While Kiel often played the character of a "big guy to push a hero around" in movies and television shows, he wasn't intimidating in real life, Davis said.

He was very approachable and would spend all day at the Collect-A-Con events visiting with fans, Davis said.

"He was just one of the nicest fellas. With so many celebrities that I've run into at other shows, it's like, 'Oh I'm here but I'll be glad to get back home,' but he was never like that."

"He was a very humble person who was thankful for his life and what he got to do," Davis said. "He loved telling funny stories about working with Clint Eastwood on 'Pale Rider' and he always had nice things to say about his co-workers and his co-actors."

Dave Fly, 66, of Selma, co-host of Fresno Collect-A-Con, added of Kiel: "There was not a single actor that I know -- and I've been around the industry for a while -- that put him down in any way. They all loved him, they all cared about him, and they will miss him."

Kiel's son said his father felt strongly about giving back to the community. He suggested that those wishing to celebrate his father donate to UNICEF, his favorite charity. Kiel is survived by his wife, Jackie, three sons and a daughter.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2014 1:17 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Paul Revere, '60s rocker and leader of the Raiders, dies at 76



Paul Revere, leader of the 1960s rock band Paul Revere and the Raiders, died Saturday at his home in Idaho, the band's website reported. He was 76.

Revere -- whose birth name was Paul Revere Dick, according to a biography on the Internet Movie Database -- was frontman for the band that often performed in three-cornered hats and other clothing harking back to the Ameican Revolution.

Revere was born in Nebraska and played in bands in Idaho and Oregon, according to a tribute on the band website written by Roger Hart, who managed the group in the early days. Hart said he took the band to Hollywood and signed them to a deal with CBS/Columbia Records.

The band recorded a string of hits in the 1960s and early 1970s, including "Kicks," "Hungry" and "Indian Reservation." Revere, the band's organist, had a hyperactive effervescent stage personality and came to be known as "the madman of rock 'n' roll."
Paul Revere, on keyboards, performs with Paul Revere & the Raiders in the 1960\'s.
Paul Revere, on keyboards, performs with Paul Revere & the Raiders in the 1960's.

In a tribute on the band's website, a fan remembered seeing the band for the first time.

"My dad took me to a Paul Revere and the Raiders concert in Buffalo NY in April of 1967," she wrote. "I think other than the male acts he was the ONLY man there. He said he was deaf for a week afterward, but he admitted he'd enjoyed the show and the Raiders. The Raiders were always fun and in good taste, parents didn't have to worry."

The band's fame grew as the Raiders appeared on "Dick Clark's American Bandstand," "Where the Action Is," the "Ed Sullivan Show," the "Tonight Show with Johnny Carson" and even the "Batman" television show, Hart wrote.

Revere recognized his debt to Clark. In a CNN.com story, Revere wrote about seeing his mentor six weeks before Clark's death in 2012.

"I gave him a hug and told him everything I have and everything I am I owe to him," Revere wrote.

The band became a fixture on the oldies circuit in later years and had a tour scheduled to start in November.

Revere's cause of death was not disclosed, but Hart said Revere died "peacefully."

Besides Revere, the original Raiders included Mark Lindsay, Phil Volk, Drake Levin and Mike Smith, the website said. Levin and Smith have died.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2014 10:28 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

RIP Richard Kiel
RIP Paul Revere
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 5:18 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Harold A. "Baggy" Bagdasarian



BAGDASARIAN, Harold A. "Baggy" Harold A. "Baggy" Bagdasarian, for more than five decades a nationally-recognized master of custom car and hot rod showmanship and promotion, passed away in Sacramento, CA, Thursday, October 16. He was 91, he passed away peacefully with his family by his side. He is survived by his loving wife Willi, daughter Linda Winther, son Bud Bagdasarian, and son in law Gene Winther. He is also survived by his sister Lucy Wheeler. Devoted grandfather to Cris Winther and Lauren Koucouthakis, 4 great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his brothers, Irwin and Elmer Bagdasarian. He was born in Fresno and came to Sacramento in 1940, joined the Army, married (Willi who was his partner, in life for 70 years. He went into the Army Air Corps in 1943 and was a Ball Gunner. In 1947 he went into the Cab business called "Capitol Cab Co". In 1948 with his brother Elmer they built the first 5 minute Car Wash in the country. In 1950 he founded the" Sacramento Autorama", as president of the Capitol Auto Club. In 1955 he started Fox Theatrical Advertising, which were search lights for Grand opening of companies. In 1958 & 1959 he promoted ¼ mile motorcycle races at Hugh Stadium in Sacramento. In 1960 he started Flasco, a lighting service company. In 1962 and 1963 he also produced indoor Midget races at Cal Expo. And in 1966 and 1967 he produced short track Motorcycled races at Cal Expo. In 1971 he started Capco Industries, and developed and manufactured a battery operated air freshener. In 1991 he started" Rent A Fone", a company that rented cell phone to state workers, and anyone that need a phone for a week or so, out on business trips. The Sacramento Autorama show at Cal Expo, now in its sixth decade, Baggy was also a daring and persistent impresario who by 1976 managed and had ownership interest in 9 Northern California shows that drew nearly 150,000 motoring enthusiasts, including the Grand National Oakland Roadster Show, "World of Wheels" in San Mateo, San Jose Autorama, Sacramento International Bike & Van Show, Street Machines at Cal Expo, The Santa Rosa Show, Redding Car Show, and the Reno Show. His first show, one to settle an argument among two Thunderbolts' members about which one had the most beautiful roadster, was held Armistice Day, 1950, and featured 22 cars was held at The Sacramento Capitol Chevrolet Co. "I made a $1.74," he recalled in an earlier interview. The show grew- graduating to Sacramento's Memorial Auditorium, then on to Merchandise Mart at the old State Fair Grounds, finally 1970 to Cal Expo. He managed and and worked out every detail for their shows. He was a believer in showmanship for the whole family and his productions always included a mix of entertainment for the kids to TV personalities for the adults. He was among the first showmen to screen continuous race car films. His ability to consistently showcase the finest available cars in a string of exhibitions was a tribute to his relationship with the motoring community, builders, stylists, painters, car owners themselves and representatives of an expanding performance industry serving car enthusiasts everywhere. -

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 26, 2014 12:04 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS



LONDON (AP) — British musician Jack Bruce, best known as the bassist from the 1960s group Cream, has died. He was 71.

Publicist Claire Singers said Saturday Bruce died at his home in Suffolk, England.


A statement released by his family said "the world of music will be a poorer place without him but he lives on in his music and forever in our hearts."
"It is with great sadness that we, Jack's family, announce the passing of our beloved Jack: husband, father, granddad, and all round legend," the statement said.
Cream, which also included guitarist Eric Clapton and drummer Ginger Baker sold 35 million albums in just over two years and were awarded the world's first ever platinum disc for their album Wheels of Fire.


Bruce wrote and sang most of the songs, including I Feel Free, White Room, 'Politician and Sunshine Of Your Love.


Cream split in November 1968, and Bruce went on to front his own bands.


Many artists covered Bruce's songs, including Jimi Hendrix, David Bowie and Ella Fitzgerald.


Bruce returned to the studio around 2000 to record his solo album Shadows in the Air, which hit number five on the British jazz and blues chart.


Bruce was born to musical parents in Glasgow, Scotland on May 14, 1943. His parents travelled extensively in Canada and the U.S., and the young Bruce attended 14 different schools. He finished his formal education at Bellahouston Academy and the Royal Scottish Academy of Music, to which he won a scholarship for cello and composition.


He left Scotland at the age of 16 and in 1962 joined his first important band, the influential Alexis Korner's Blues Inc., in London. The band featured drummer Charlie Watts, later to join the Rolling Stones.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2014 2:56 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2015 8:55 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS




Donna Douglas, who played the buxom tomboy Elly May Clampett

on the hit 1960s sitcom "The Beverly Hillbillies," has died.

Her niece says Douglas died Thursday in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, near her hometown of Zachary. The cause of death was pancreatic cancer, Charlene Smith said. Douglas was 81.

She was best known for her role in "The Beverly Hillbillies," the CBS comedy about a backwoods Ozark family who moved to Beverly Hills after striking it rich from oil discovered on their land.

The series, which ran from 1962 to 1971, also starred the late Buddy Ebsen and Irene Ryan as well as Max Baer Jr., who turns 77 on Sunday.

As Elly May, she seemed blissfully unaware of her status as a bumpkin blond bombshell. Typically she was clad in a snug flannel shirt and tight jeans cinched with a rope belt, and she seemed to prefer her critters to any beau.

Chosen from more than 500 other actresses, Douglas said she felt at ease playing the role because, like her character, she grew up a poor Southern tomboy. Her childhood in Pride, Louisiana, came in handy when she was asked during her audition to milk a goat.

"I had milked cows before," she recalled in a 2009 interview with The Associated Press. "I figured they were equipped the same, so I just went on over and did it."

The show was not only assailed by critics, but by the network president who put it on the air: "I HATED it," Michael Dann confided much later. "After screening the pilot, I don't think I ever watched another segment."

The public, however, felt quite the opposite: It ran for nine seasons, often in the Top 10. In their own way, the Clampetts were a forerunner of the '60s counterculture.

It wasn't much of a stretch for Douglas to fit into the troupe, said her cousin, Charlene Smith.

"She was always happy, and she really loved animals - just like her character on 'The Beverly Hillbillies.' She was a wonderful lady, a very good Christian lady."

Indeed, when Douglas gave her autograph, she included a biblical verse ("Trust in the Lord with all your heart..."), according to New Orleans TV station WAFB.

Douglas' career began with beauty pageants - she was Miss Baton Rouge and Miss New Orleans - followed by a trip to New York to pursue a career in entertainment.

"That was the first time I had ever been on an airplane," Douglas said.

While modeling didn't appeal to her - "I didn't want to be that skinny" - television did. Douglas was featured as the Letters Girl on "The Perry Como Show" in 1957 and as the Billboard Girl on "The Steve Allen Show" in 1959.

She landed a featured role in the 1959 film "Career," starring Dean Martin and Shirley MacLaine, and a bit part in the film musical "Li'l Abner." She also had a small role as Tony Randall's secretary in the 1961 romantic comedy "Lover Come Back" with Rock Hudson and Doris Day.

Douglas starred in one of the most memorable episodes of Rod Serling's "The Twilight Zone" - titled "Eye of the Beholder," it was the one in which her head is wrapped in bandages for most of the half-hour after plastic surgery aimed at fixing her "ugliness," which in fact was beauty in a universe of monsters. And she starred opposite Elvis Presley in the 1966 movie "Frankie and Johnny."

After "The Beverly Hillbillies," Douglas worked in real estate, recorded country and gospel music albums and wrote a book for children that drew on biblical themes.

In 2010 she sued CBS and toymaker Mattel over a Barbie doll that used Elly May's name and likeness. The suit was settled in 2011.

She said she never minded being typecast as her "Hillbillies" character.

"So many kinds of people relate to Elly May," Douglas said. "So many people love her, and that means a lot to me."

Douglas was married twice, to Roland John Bourgeois, Jr. until 1954, and then to The Beverly Hillbillies director Robert M. Leeds. They divorced in 1980 after nine years of marriage. Survivors include her son, Danny P. Bourgeois.


SORRY! i dont know how to post picture,but maybe bagz does.this was one of my favorite shows just because i loved all the characters!
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 3:03 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS



Stuart Scott dies at age of 49

Stuart Scott, a longtime anchor at ESPN, died Sunday morning at the age of 49.

Among the features of the new ESPN studio in Bristol is a wall of catchphrases made famous by on-air talent over the years. An amazing nine of them belong to one man -- from his signature "Boo-Yah!" to "As cool as the other side of the pillow" to "He must be the bus driver cuz he was takin' him to school."

That man is Stuart Scott, and his contributions to the sports lexicon are writ large. But they are only one aspect of his legacy. When he passed away, he left behind so much more. He inspired his colleagues with his sheer talent, his work ethic and his devotion to his daughters, Taelor, 19, and Sydni, 15. He defied convention and criticism to help bring this network into a new century. He spoke to the very athletes he was talking about with a flair and a style that ESPN president John Skipper says, "changed everything."

"He didn't just push the envelope," says sports radio host and former ESPN anchor Dan Patrick. "He bulldozed it."

And he saved his best for his last year on the air. At the ESPYs on July 16, shortly before his 49th birthday and following another round of cancer surgery, Stuart accepted the Jimmy V Award for Perseverance with strength, humor, grace and these eloquent words: "When you die, it does not mean that you lose to cancer. You beat cancer by how you live, why you live, and in the manner in which you live."

So while the grief is deep at ESPN over the death of Stuart Scott, so is our gratitude. He was as popular on-campus as he was in the airports he passed through and on the sidelines he worked over the last 22 years. He brought so much to the party, and he will continue to do so, through the people he inspired, and the language that he liberated, and the audience that will remember him.

Steve Levy, who came to ESPN shortly before Stuart in August of 1993 and served as his co-host for the first "SportsCenter" from the new studio last June, put it this way: "I think the audience recognized that when Stuart was on, there was going to be something special. And to his credit, he brought something special every night he was on."

"SportsCenter" anchor Jay Harris, who grew up watching -- and hoping to be -- Stuart, says, "Think about that phrase, 'As cool as the other side of the pillow.' It's a hot, stifling night. You're having trouble sleeping. But then you think to turn the pillow over, and, Wow, it's cool, and it feels so good.

"Well, that's who Stuart is. He is 'the other side of pillow,' the man who made sportscasting cool. God bless whoever it was who thought to rearrange the bedding at ESPN."

Stuart was born in Chicago, but he, along with two sisters and a brother, spent his formative years in North Carolina, where their father was a postal inspector who always had time to play after work. Stuart went to Richard J. Reynolds High in Winston-Salem and then the University of North Carolina, where he played wide receiver and defensive back on the club football team, joined Alpha Phi Alpha and worked at the student radio station, WXYC. After graduating in 1987 with a degree in speech communication, Stuart was hired by WPDE-TV in Florence, S.C. He says that's where he first came up with the pillow metaphor. "People say I stole it from a movie," he told an interviewer in 1998, "but I first thought of that and said it on my first job ... I just liked it."

His career path took him from Florence to Raleigh, North Carolina, to Orlando, Florida, and in his pre-ESPN clips, you can feel his energy, hear his music and sense his on-camera charisma. At WESH, the NBC affiliate in Orlando, he first met ESPN producer Gus Ramsey, who was beginning his own career. Says Ramsey, "You knew the second he walked in the door that it was a pit stop, and that he was gonna be this big star somewhere some day. He went out and did a piece on the rodeo, and he nailed it just like he would nail the NBA Finals for ESPN."

He first met ESPN anchor Chris Berman in Tampa. "He stuck out his hand and said, 'One day I look forward to working with you.' And I said, 'Well, I tell you what, we'll save you a seat.' And I'm really thrilled that he was right on. [Later] I said, 'Stu, maybe you were the Swami.'"

The person most responsible for bringing Stuart to Bristol was Al Jaffe, ESPN's vice-president for talent, who was looking for sportscasters who might appeal to a younger audience for ESPN2. "One of the producers on a story we were doing on the Orlando Magic told me about this young guy he really liked. I followed up and found out that Stuart's contract was up soon. He sent me a tape, and even then, he had an amazing presence -- I felt the viewer would sit up and take notice when he was on the air."

His first real assignments were for "SportsSmash," a short sportscast twice an hour on ESPN2's "SportsNight" program. When Keith Olbermann graduated from "SportsNight" to ESPN's "SportsCenter," Stuart took his place in the anchor chair. "He was like a ball of fire walking in the door," says ESPN senior vice president Mark Gross, a coordinating producer at the time, "I had never met anybody like Stuart Scott."

"I've called him Boo-Yah forever," says Norby Williamson, the ESPN senior vice-president who helped guide Stuart during those early years. "Ever since he used that catchphrase on the air for the first time, and we looked at each other and said, 'What the hell is that?'"

That was the future, and it looked and sounded different from the present. "There were successful African-American sportscasters at the time," says ESPN director of news Vince Doria, who oversaw the studio programming for ESPN2 back then. "But Stuart spoke a much different language... that appealed to a young demographic, particularly a young African-American demographic."

Suzy Kolber, the ESPN anchor who also began at ESPN2, says, "Stuart called me his TV wife, but we really were like a family, trying to launch this brand new network and spending all this time together. Fortunately, some of us lasted longer than ESPN2 did.

"When he went to ESPN, Stuart didn't change his style -- and there was some resistance. Even I encouraged him to maybe take a more traditional approach, but he had a strong conviction about who he wanted to be, and the voice he wanted to project, and clearly, he was right, and we were wrong."

Gus Ramsey, who arrived in Bristol in 1994, remembers exactly when he knew Stuart had found a new audience. "In the fall of '95 I asked him if he wanted to go to my high school homecoming football game in Greenwich, Conn., and he said, 'Sure, let's go.' We got there mid-first quarter, and we just kind of walked up to the sidelines, and one by one, the kids start comin' over to him. It didn't hit me until that moment that this guy was making an impact."

But as Stuart's star rose, so did the bile of those who resented his color, or his hip-hop style, or his generation. He received a lot of hate mail, most of it anonymous. If the senders did leave a name and address, Stuart would answer and ask them to tell him what the problem really was.

He was disarming in other ways, as well. He may have represented new school, but he was decidedly old school when it came to preparation. Nobody could ever say he didn't work hard, or labor over his "SportsCenter" lead-ins. "He was really conscious of getting it right," says ESPN anchor Linda Cohn. "He had that great balance of being entertaining and being right."

And as cocky and brash as he was, he liked nothing better than to sing a good duet every night. For years, he and Rich Eisen would do just that on the 1 a.m. "SportsCenter," a show that made its way to the next day's water cooler thanks to their chemistry -- and repeated viewings. Yes, there was an Ebony and Ivory theme to their show, but more importantly, they were two young sports nuts playing off one another for the benefit of other young sports nuts.

Eisen, now the lead anchor for the NFL Network, says, "Who would have thought the perfect guy for me, a Jewish kid from Staten Island, would be an African-American guy with North Carolina roots? Sometimes neither one of us knew who the other was talking about, but it worked. It was always a trip doing a 'SportsCenter' with Stuart."

ESPN anchor John Anderson likens the talent wave at the network to NASA's astronaut programs. "There was the Mercury program, which gave us Chris Berman and Bob Ley, great pilots who went up there without teleprompters or whatever. Then along came the Apollo astronauts, like Keith Olbermann and Dan Patrick, Rich Eisen and Stuart. They took us to the moon... and left the rest of us to fly the space shuttle."

The confines of a studio could not hold Stuart. Before the millennium arrived, he was covering the MLB playoffs, the Final Four and the NBA Finals. He wrote for ESPN The Magazine and went one-in-one in interviews with Tiger Woods and Michael Jordan. Once the century rolled over, he did pretty much everything, hosting game shows and New Year's Eve specials, sitting down with President Obama, and becoming the guiding light for NBA and NFL coverage. There were a few downs mixed in with the ups, though. He suffered an eye injury while trying to catch a pass at a New York Jets mini-camp, necessitating surgery that put him out of work for a few months. His marriage to Kimberly Scott, the mother of their daughters, came to an end. And on Nov. 26, 2007, while covering the "Monday Night Football" game between the Steelers and Dolphins, Stuart had to have an emergency appendectomy that revealed a malignancy requiring additional surgery.

Through it all, Stuart remained upbeat and defiant. "That's what I love about him," says Suzy Kolber. "No matter how big he got, now matter how bad it got, he never changed. He loved his work, he loved his daughters, he loved being Stu."

And he continued to do "SportsCenter". "Nobody, with the possible exception of Chris Berman, does highlights as well as Stu," says Kolber.

So, with that in mind, and with the help of his colleagues, here are the Top Ten roles Stuart played for ESPN:

Competitor. "He wasn't as good an athlete as he thought he was," says Harris, a frequent golfing partner. "But he was the best-dressed guy on the course."

Patrick remembers an epic basketball game at the YMCA. "Stuart was playing like it was the seventh game of the NBA Finals, and he's guarding me like I'm Michael Jordan... I drive to the hoop, he undercuts me, I fall on my back and nearly pass out. I go back out on the floor, say, 'Give me the damn ball,' Stuart D's me up, make the shot, walk off the floor and go to the emergency room because I chipped a vertebrae.

"I recently told that story on the air. And Stuart tweets, 'You may have scored, but I sent you to the hospital.' That's my Stuart."

That competitive nature always made for a better show. According to anchor Scott Van Pelt, "Stuart would always say to me, 'Game recognizes game.' You try to bring out the best in yourself so you can bring out the best in the person next to you."

Friend. For all his fame, Stuart was buds with everybody in Bristol, be they production assistants or co-hosts or executives. "He was Stu to everybody in the halls," says Anderson, "but Stuart on the air. I found him to be one of the few people in this business who is actually much nicer off TV than he is on. He was just one of the first guys to say, 'Hey, I'm going to play golf, wanna come with me?'"

His offer of friendship took on a deeper meaning for ESPN vice president Tim Scanlan: "When he found out that my wife had the same type of cancer he had, he was one of the first people to reach out to me and offer help. He started giving me advice... and I in turn would talk to my wife. And every time she saw him on the air, you could see a noticeable pickup in her spirit and energy and in her ambition to fight another day."

"NBA Countdown" anchor Sage Steele remembers the day last year when her family moved from Connecticut to Arizona to be closer to her show in Los Angeles: "The moving trucks were at my house, and Stuart was there with his girlfriend Kristin to say goodbye to us, and my 10-year-old son Nicholas had to say goodbye to his best friend across the street, and he came back sobbing, sobbing, leaving his best friend in the world... Stuart said, 'I got it.' And he took Nicholas aside and just sat down with him and described his moving away as a kid, losing his best friend as a 10-year-old boy and how he handled it. He spent 20 minutes sitting there with Nicholas, helping him feel better.

"Stuart spent three hours at our house that day, in pain and hardly able to stand, but he did it. And he sat there for my kid."

Celebrity. At a certain point, Stuart became as famous as the athletes he covered. That's partly why he starred in so many "This is 'SportsCenter'" commercials, alongside Tiger, Kobe, Keyshawn, LeBron, Mr. Met... and Chad Johnson, who rejected Stuart's idea for a touchdown celebration with "Boo-No!"

Eisen was there at the birth of his fame. "The Saturday night before the NBA All-Star Game in New York City. Stuart and I had to do the 11 o'clock 'SportsCenter,' so with a lead foot, we got to Times Square at around 2 in the morning, and the party at the All-Star Café with Gretzky and Shaq and Tiger is letting out. A cop gives us the coordinates for the after-party, and now we're walking to 33rd and 10th Avenue... Stuart walking down the street was like Elvis entering the building. People were stopping us every two feet. I'll never forget when one person went up to Stuart and me and said, 'Hey, wow, Stuart Scott!' Then the guy looks at me and goes, 'And the white guy. I love you, the white guy!' And Stuart laughed so hard because it sort of confirmed his belief that he provided me with street cred."

African-American. ESPN knew enough to have sportscasters who represented 45 million Americans, not to mention 80 percent of the players in NBA and 70 percent of those in the NFL. What we didn't know, until Stuart got here, was how important it was to have someone who could relate to them.

"He was a trailblazer," says ESPN anchor Stan Verrett, "not only because he was black -- obviously black -- but because of his style, his demeanor, his presentation. He did not shy away from the fact that he was a black man, and that allowed the rest of us who came along to just be ourselves."

"Yes, he brought hip-hop into the conversation," says Harris, "but I would go further than that. He brought in the barber shop, the church, R&B, soul music. Soul period."

Some of his best moments on the air came when he adopted the persona of a preacher -- "Can I get a witness from the congregation?!" And one of his best moments off the air came when a producer suggested he change a reference on his NBA show from Omega Psi Phi, the fraternity of Michael Jordan and Shaquille O'Neal, to something more universal, like Animal House.

"I have friends who have no idea what that movie is about," Stuart told him. "That movie was made two decades ago, and black fraternities have been around since 1906."

Worker. "I never found him without a statistic to back up what he was saying," says Patrick. "He wanted you to know that he knew what he was talking about, and he never failed."

There were times in the last few years when his friends worried that he was working too hard. "He'd be tired," says anchor John Buccigross. "But once he sat down in the chair... he would just start to click in and get that zero focus ... 'Where's this guy from?' ... 'Who has the most triples of all time?' Once he got into the show, you just forgot about everything, and it was just Stuart Scott doin' 'SportsCenter,' havin' fun."

Poet. "Listen to his lead-ins," says Buccigross. "They're thoughtful and precise, really well-constructed lead-ins to a news story or big game or moment."

Yes, he would reference Tupac, but he also would quote Shakespeare: "full of sound and fury, signifying nothing."

And occasionally, he would bust out his own poetry, as he did for this jam on Michael Jordan's 50th birthday on Feb. 17, 3013:

the best ever... a CLEVER phrase we OVERuse ...
when mere greatness becomes our MUSE...
or artistic inspiration... but the real celebration
of "best ever" is an ENDEAVOR
into MORE than GREAT! WAIT...
didn't you see the tongue wagging...shorts baggy...
practically DRAGGING teammates to 1-nc2a..2-gold...
brotha I was sold when he won 6-NBA rings...
but the THING that makes "best ever" SING....
not scoring titles and-MVP's,
the double nickel that sliced the knicks at their knees...
the 63 he put on Bird...Larry Legend sayin PLEASE...
is that GOD?

As for Stuart's most famous line, Eisen discovered one night that it was not what's up on the wall in the new studio. Recalls Eisen: "He would write down the catchphrases on the specific portion of the highlight, so I would watch him do this, and it wasn't 'Boo-Yah,' it was 'Boo-Yow.' He would spell it out B-O-O dash Y-O-W. He was a technician when it came to that sort of thing. I remember being jarred, and when I asked him about it, he thought I was making fun of him. But I wasn't."

Father. "His girls mean everything to him," says Harris. "I mean his girls mean everything to him. He would easily take Stuart Scott, Dad, over Stuart Scott, 'SportsCenter' Anchor."

"He's a great, great Dad," says Ramsey. "He just takes so much pride in the girls, and you can't see him without him taking out his phone and showing you a video of Taelor or Sydni singing or dancing or playing soccer."

Occasionally, Stuart would give a shout-out to Sydni's soccer team, but that was easy compared to another commitment he made to his daughters. "His daughters and my daughters danced at the same studio," says Anderson. "One year we went to their performance of 'The Nutcracker.' And here comes Uncle Drosselmeyer, and I thought, 'That man looks a lot like Stuart Scott,' and it was -- he was there for his girls. I'll never forget him coming out in this big cape, swooping in with his nutcracker, and he was great. I'm not sure the dance steps were up to Baryshnikov, but certainly the intentions were."

Charmer. Stuart's role in The Nutcracker was not unlike one of the roles he played at ESPN. For those not up on their Tchaikovsky, Uncle Drosselmeyer is the toymaker who brings the tableau to life at midnight -- sort of what Stuart did in Bristol.

Anderson calls it "magic." Harris calls it his "Stuartness." It's this ineffable way Stuart had of welcoming you to the party, bringing you into his confidence, making sure you were having a good time. A classic talent like Vin Scully might ask you to pull up a chair. Stuart would bring you a beer and introduce you to Tiger or Michael or Peyton.

Warrior. Stuart and Steve Levy share one personal career highlight: Taking "SportsCenter" to Camp Arifjan in Kuwait in 2004. "The soldiers kept coming up to thank us, and we're like, 'No, we're here to thank you.' Stuart and I were both patriotic, but this took it to a whole new level of respect for what our men and women in uniform go through."

Ten years later, Levy watched a different kind of warrior go to work. "He was so tired. We'd be waiting for a game to end, and he'd close his eyes... That wasn't the Stuart Scott that I worked with for so many years. And yet, when the red light came on, when he was on camera, you had no idea. He never slipped. His ability never slipped, and the audience at home couldn't tell what Stuart was dealing with."

In a telling piece in The New York Times last March 12, Richard Sandomir spent the day with Stuart as he worked out at a martial arts studio in West Hartford, Conn. At one point, he lifted up his EVERYDAY I FIGHT shirt to reveal the scar from his abdominal surgeries. "I never ask what stage I'm in," Stuart told Sandomir. "I haven't wanted to know... I'm trying to fight it the best I can."

Champion. On June 16, Stuart flawlessly handled the trophy presentation to the Spurs -- after doing 300 push-ups that day. "We stood on the floor," says Williamson, "and there's all these things going around -- and immediately we snapped back to 20 years ago ... and I just ... told him I was proud of him, and I loved him."

A month later, as Sage Steele watched Stuart climb the steps to the stage at the ESPYs, she worried about whether he could deliver his speech.

"But then I reminded myself, 'Hello, who are you talking about here? This is Stuart and he's not going to let this moment get away.' ... raw and honest, powerful and indelible ... He owned it, just like he owned every sportscast, every "SportsCenter," every "Monday Night Football" show he did. He owned it."

Since that night, "You beat cancer by how you live" has become a rallying cry for millions of patients and their families.

Stuart won.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 25, 2015 8:32 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

ERNIE BANKS - 1931-2015





Mr. Cub! "It's a great day for baseball. Let's play two!''

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2015 2:28 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

RIP to all of the above! Legends
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 08, 2015 4:33 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

DEAN SMITH 1931-2015


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 12:23 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS



Jerry Tarkanian loved a good fight.

It could be on the basketball court matching wits with Bob Knight, Mike Krzyzewski, Lute Olson or John Thompson. Or it could be in a courtroom taking on the NCAA with a boatload of lawyers in tow.

Tarkanian wasn’t the type to back down, and he always scrapped and fought. Even when his health failed him in the latter years of his remarkable life, he showed a willingness to fight in a hospital intensive care unit.

Tarkanian, the iconic towel-chomping coach who put UNLV on the map as a national college basketball power and repeatedly clashed with the NCAA during his career, died from respiratory and cardiac failure at 9:05 a.m. Wednesday at Valley Hospital Medical Center. He was 84.

In a statement issued by the Tarkanian family, his wife, Lois, said: “Jerry has been in fragile health since 2009. He fought his health problems with the same tenacity he showed throughout his life. Our family thanks, from the bottom of our hearts, all those who have sent letters and prayers, who have shown their love for Jerry and support for our family, the numerous fans and the many players who considered him a second father. Our hearts are broken but filled with incredible memories.”

Tarkanian had been recovering from a nearly monthlong stay in the hospital and was getting his strength back, Lois Tarkanian said of her husband of 60 years.

On Sunday, he was home, resting, watching basketball on TV and even making plans to attend Tuesday night’s Fresno State-UNLV game at the Thomas &Mack Center.

But on Monday morning, Tarkanian began having trouble breathing. His blood pressure had dropped to a dangerous level, and he was rushed to Valley, where doctors had managed to keep him alive in previous visits. He was unresponsive throughout the day in the intensive care unit and into the early evening until doctors were able to get his blood pressure elevated. He suffered a setback in the early morning hours Tuesday and was in critical condition.

A private funeral will be Monday. A public memorial service will be held March 1 at the Thomas &Mack Center at a time to be determined.

‘THERE WAS ONLY ONE TARK’

Tarkanian, a 2013 inductee into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass., coached 31 years on the Division I level at Long Beach State, UNLV and Fresno State and finished his career with a 784-202 record. In his 19-year run with UNLV, from 1973 to 1992, Tarkanian went 509-105 for an .829 winning percentage. He took the Rebels to the Final Four four times, winning the NCAA title in 1990, the only one the program has ever won.

“He was like a second father to me,” former UNLV star Larry Johnson said in 2013 when Tarkanian was inducted into the Hall of Fame. “I loved that man.”

Greg Anthony, Johnson’s teammate from 1989 to 1991, echoed similar comments at the induction, saying: “Some of us didn’t have fathers. But Coach Tarkanian’s door was always open. You could talk to him about anything.”

Dave Rice, the Rebels’ head coach who played for Tarkanian and later coached under him, said: “The qualities that make UNLV a great university — opportunity, self-determination and equality — are the same qualities that Coach Tarkanian ingrained in his teams. The impact of Coach’s contributions to our university, our community, his players and all of college basketball are immeasurable.”

Former UNLV athletic director Brad Rothermel, who worked with Tarkanian from 1981 to 1990, said Tuesday: “There wasn’t an individual who gave us more recognition as a university than Jerry Tarkanian. He took us from Tumbleweed Tech, a small college in the desert nobody had ever heard of, to a nationally known institution.”

Mark Warkentien, who worked as an assistant under Tarkanian from 1981 to 1987, said of his former boss: “There was only one Tark. A coach who could show Las Vegas how to win and make the NCAA a tighter ship.”

Tarkanian had success at virtually every stop during a coaching career that spanned five decades. But it was at UNLV where he achieved the most success.

Thirty-nine of his players were drafted by NBA teams, nine in the first round. Johnson was the No. 1 overall pick in the 1991 draft, selected by the Charlotte Hornets, and Armon Gilliam was the No. 2 overall pick in the 1987 draft by the Phoenix Suns.

That success landed Tarkanian a spot among the basketball elite in Springfield. Despite his failing health and inability to carry on a lengthy conversation, Tarkanian enjoyed the induction weekend, during which he was given a lengthy standing ovation at the ceremonies.

“This is wonderful,” he said. “This is a great honor, and I’m very grateful to the Hall of Fame. I’m glad my family was able to enjoy it with me.”

Tarkanian’s contributions to basketball still can be found today. His defensive pressing style. His up-tempo offense. His effective use of the 3-point shot. His ability to relate and communicate with African-American players.

Those elements are used by many of today’s college coaches.

“The first thing we need to remember about Jerry is what he brought to the game of basketball,” Rothermel said. “He was the first to employ a full-court defense combined with a fast-break offense. Some schools had one or the other but not both. He helped change the way basketball was played and is still played today.”

OFF AND RUNNIN’

Tarkanian was born the son of Armenian immigrants on Aug. 8, 1930, in Euclid, Ohio. His relationship with basketball began as a player at Pasadena City College in California. He transferred to Fresno State in 1954 and played two years before graduating in 1955.

His coaching career began at the high school level. But unlike most in his profession, Tarkanian never served as an assistant coach. He always was a head coach.

After stints at three high schools, Tarkanian moved to the junior college level in 1961, becoming Riverside City College’s head coach. His teams won three straight California junior college titles.

From there, he went back to Pasadena City College, where he coached for two years before he was named the head coach at Long Beach State.

It was with the 49ers that he had his first run-in with the NCAA. He questioned UCLA’s pristine image under coach John Wooden in a newspaper column he wrote for the Long Beach Press-Telegram, and eventually the NCAA came to Long Beach State to investigate Tarkanian’s program.

By the time the NCAA was through with its investigation, Tarkanian was gone. He had been approached by a group of boosters from Las Vegas in 1972 to come to UNLV. Initially, he rejected their offer but reconsidered after the 1972-73 season and accepted the school’s head coaching position.

At the time, the Rebels were playing in the rotunda at the Las Vegas Convention Center. They were in the West Coast Athletic Conference and had played a deliberate style of basketball under then-coach John Bayer.

In Tarkanian, the boosters were hoping to see a more up-tempo offense, one that would get crowds excited and generate more donations to the university, as it was looking to build an on-campus basketball arena.

Tarkanian delivered. With deft recruiting, he signed much more athletic players. The Rebels used pressure defense to force turnovers and easy baskets. Suddenly, they were pushing the ball on offense and blowing out teams.

But his first game at UNLV did not go well. His team lost to Texas Tech 82-76, and Tarkanian went on the postgame radio show and said he wouldn’t be surprised if he were fired, given the lofty expectations attached to his arrival.

That wouldn’t happen for 19 years.

His first Rebels team went 20-6. In 1975, UNLV made its first-ever NCAA Division I Tournament appearance, going 24-5 and losing to Arizona State in the second round.

The team was dubbed the “Runnin’ Rebels” because it was up-tempo and posted triple-digit scores. Tarkanian was known as “Tark the Shark,” as fans embraced his style and his players’ flair.

“We had to play that way because of the kids we had,” Tarkanian said years ago in a documentary about the program. “We didn’t have a lot of size. But we had great athletes, and we used our speed and quickness.”

NATIONAL SPOTLIGHT, AND NCAA SCRUTINY

By 1977, the Rebels had become a national power, and after beating San Francisco, Utah and Idaho State in the NCAA Tournament, Tarkanian was in his first Final Four.

That team, known as “The Hardway Eight” because he played a short rotation, faced North Carolina in the national semifinals at the Omni in Atlanta. The Rebels, who averaged 109 points that season, struggled against the Tar Heels, who employed coach Dean Smith’s famous “Four Corners” offense and defeated UNLV 84-83.

At that point, kids from all over the country wanted to be part of the Rebels’ fast-paced style of play and coached by Tarkanian, who had a reputation for giving his players freedom on offense provided they worked hard on defense.

Tarkanian had become a celebrity. He rubbed elbows with the likes of Frank Sinatra, and a ticket to a UNLV game became the most sought-after in Las Vegas.

Tarkanian would later use his celebrity to make it to the big screen. He appeared in the 1992 movie “Honeymoon in Vegas” as poker player Sid Feder, and he played himself as a coach in the 1994 basketball movie “Blue Chips.” In 2011, HBO did a documentary on Tarkanian and the UNLV basketball program — “Runnin’ Rebels of UNLV.”

Still, despite landing some excellent players, including future NBA star Sidney Green, UNLV would not return to the Final Four for another 10 years.

Meanwhile, Tarkanian’s battles with the NCAA were heating up. Just before the 1976-77 season, the NCAA placed UNLV on probation for two years, and the university was to suspend Tarkanian from coaching during that period. But he sued the NCAA, claiming he had been denied his rights as an American citizen under due process.

That case eventually went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which in 1988 ruled the NCAA, as a private voluntary organization, had the right to discipline its members. But it also ruled that Tarkanian was entitled to a proper hearing and that his due process rights had been violated.

In 1998, the NCAA and Tarkanian finally settled their differences. Tarkanian, who was coaching Fresno State at that point, was awarded $2.5 million, and while he was happy with the result, he was bitter at what he had to go through to win his case.

“It wasn’t worth it, everything I went through,” he said after the settlement.

On the court, UNLV continued to enjoy success. In 1982, while still playing at the Las Vegas Convention Center, the Rebels became part of the Pacific Coast Athletic Association after a failed attempt to join the Western Athletic Conference in 1981. The PCAA, later the Big West, would be dominated by Tarkanian’s teams throughout the 1980s and into the 1990s.

Buoyed by a renewed success at recruiting and with the support of Rothermel, his new athletic director, and assistant coach Tim Grgurich, who had previously been the head coach at Pittsburgh, Tarkanian guided UNLV back into the NCAA postseason.

In 1983-84, the Rebels went 29-6 as they christened their new home — the 18,500-seat Thomas &Mack Center, which was built on-campus and would become a house of horrors for opposing teams. In 1986, the Rebels returned to the Sweet 16 and finished 33-5, then a school record for most wins in a season.

That set the stage for UNLV’s second Final Four appearance. The 1987 team won 37 games and was a mix of an aggressive defense and deadly perimeter shooting. But the Rebels fell short in the national semifinals at the Superdome in New Orleans, losing to eventual national champion Indiana 97-93.

It was around that time that Tarkanian and the NCAA were about to butt heads again. This time, it was over the recruitment of Lloyd Daniels, a New York schoolyard prodigy who the NCAA alleged received extra benefits to attend UNLV.

Daniels was busted in a North Las Vegas crack house for trying to sell drugs and never played for UNLV. But the NCAA didn’t back off, and the school, under new president Robert Maxson, did not back its coach this time.

REBELS’ RISE, FALL AND FIXING ALLEGATIONS

While the NCAA was continuing its investigation, UNLV remained eligible for postseason play. In 1989, it reached the West Regional finals, losing to Seton Hall.

But the following year, with the addition of Johnson, a junior college All-American, joining Anthony, Stacey Augmon and Anderson Hunt, Tarkanian had the kind of team he thought could win the national championship.

The 1990 UNLV team was not perfect. It lost conference games at New Mexico State and UC Santa Barbara. Anthony, the indispensable point guard, had broken his jaw in early February against Fresno State.

But the team got hot at the right time.

It survived a scare in the West Regional semifinals, edging Ball State 69-67. In the final, UNLV blew out high-scoring Loyola Marymount 131-101 to reach the Final Four for the third time in Tarkanian’s UNLV tenure.

This time, things would be different. In the national semifinals in Denver, the Rebels rallied from seven points down at halftime to beat Georgia Tech 90-81 and earn a spot in the national championship game against Duke.

In the final, UNLV led early on, built its lead and then blew out Duke in the second half, winning 103-73, the largest margin of victory in an NCAA title game.

But the NCAA was prepared to not let Tarkanian celebrate for long. The plan was to prevent the program from defending its title in 1991. But the school negotiated a deal with the NCAA that would allow the team to play in the tournament that year in exchange for no postseason in 1992.

Johnson and Augmon returned for their senior seasons. UNLV, the No. 1 team in the country in The Associated Press and United Press International polls, went undefeated, taking a 34-0 record into the Final Four at Indianapolis, where a rematch with Duke awaited the Rebels.

And while heavily favored to repeat, the Rebels were blindsided by an aggressive Duke defense. Anthony fouled out with less than five minutes remaining, and with their point guard on the bench, UNLV struggled offensively.

In the end, Duke pulled one of college basketball’s biggest upsets ever, defeating UNLV 79-77 and ending its dream of back-to-back national titles.

Almost immediately after the game, allegations surfaced that some UNLV players might have been shaving points.

The allegations were never proved, but a cloud hung over the program, one that intensified when a photograph in the Review-Journal in May 1991 showed UNLV players in a hot tub with Richard Perry, a convicted sports fixer.

Tarkanian said he had no knowledge of the association between Perry and players Moses Scurry, David Butler and Anderson Hunt. But the school’s administration had seen enough, and ultimately it was decided that Tarkanian would resign after the 1992 season.

His final team went 26-2 but had no postseason to look forward to because of the deal it made with the NCAA. So UNLV went to court, looking for relief and a chance to rescind the ruling. It was denied.

LIFE AFTER UNLV

Tarkanian, who had turned down several offers during his UNLV tenure to coach in the NBA, including the Los Angeles Lakers in 1977, moved on. He became the coach of the San Antonio Spurs in late spring 1992 despite having no experience at the pro level.

Ironically, he was reunited in San Antonio with Daniels, who was a free agent trying to save his career. But their association didn’t last long. Tarkanian clashed with general manager Bob Bass and was fired in December 1992 with a 9-11 record.

In 1995, Tarkanian got the itch to coach again. And again, boosters approached him, this time from Fresno State, his alma mater.

He accepted the job and brought son Danny with him as an assistant coach. He was 153-80 in seven seasons at Fresno and went to two NCAA Tournaments, never making it out of the second round.

But as was the case at Long Beach State and UNLV, Tarkanian fought with the NCAA. After his retirement in 2002, Fresno State was placed on probation for violations committed under his watch, though he never was implicated.

Tarkanian never returned to the sidelines. He spent his retirement shuttling between Las Vegas, Fresno and San Diego, where he owned a summer home. He was a frequent visitor to the Del Mar Race Track, though he rarely bet on the horses.

HALL OF FAME INDUCTION

When the Southern Nevada Sports Hall of Fame was in its infancy, Tarkanian was one of its early honorees, going into the organization’s second class in 1998 with his 1977 Final Four team. It would be the start of several local and national honors Tarkanian would receive.

In 2005, UNLV named the floor at the Thomas &Mack Center “Jerry Tarkanian Court.” He had been coming to games regularly since 2001, when then-coach Charlie Spoonhour asked him to show up. That courtesy was extended further by Lon Kruger, who took over in 2004. It was Kruger who persuaded then-UNLV president Carol Harter to name the court in Tarkanian’s honor.

His health began failing in 2007. An operation to remove pressure from his spine in 2009 slowed him considerably. He was an occasional visitor to UNLV games and other college basketball events in Las Vegas, preferring to remain in the background.

When he was well enough to attend a UNLV game, his appearance would be noted on the Jumbotron video boards in the Thomas &Mack, which would elicit a standing ovation from fans.

In March 2012, Tarkanian contracted bronchitis, and after a visit to his doctor, an EKG revealed he was in the midst of suffering a mild heart attack. He was admitted to MountainView Hospital, where he spent two nights.

No surgery was required, but it was not Tarkanian’s first heart issue. He had received an angioplasty procedure twice since he had retired from coaching. He also had circulation issues in 2010 that limited his mobility to the point to which he needed assistance to walk.

He was on the ballot for the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame on three occasions but failed to gain the necessary votes for induction. In a 2012 interview, Tarkanian said going into the Hall of Fame would have meant a lot to him.

“It would be nice, not only for me but for all our players and coaches,” he said. “But it would also be nice for my family.”

The call finally came shortly before the 2013 Final Four in Atlanta. After years of trying, Tarkanian was now a member of the Hall of Fame. Among those he was inducted with included college coaching contemporaries and friends Rick Pitino and Guy V. Lewis.

“It’s a real exciting time for me,” Tarkanian said. “I think it validates everything I’ve done in basketball.”

Jerry Colangelo, the chairman of the Hall of Fame, said of Tarkanian’s election: “Time has a way of healing things. And in this case, time worked in his favor.”

Many of Tarkanian’s former players and coaches attended the ceremony in September 2013. He needed assistance to walk to the stage, where he was presented by Hall of Famers Bill Walton and Pete Carril.

In October 2013, UNLV unveiled a life-sized bronze statue of Tarkanian on the plaza adjacent to the Thomas &Mack Center and Cox Pavilion. The statue, which shows Tarkanian chewing on his trademark towel and with the empty “ghost chair” next to him, was made possible through private donations in the community for what is officially known as the “Jerry Tarkanian Legacy Project.”

Tarkanian also was honored by Long Beach State and Fresno State after his Hall of Fame induction. A high school tournament — The Tarkanian Classic — has been played at Bishop Gorman High since 2012 and features some of the nation’s best teams.

HEALTH TROUBLES

His declining health had made it tough for Tarkanian to enjoy all the honors that had been bestowed upon him. A series of small strokes and the heart problems robbed him of his strength, and he could not speak for extended periods. In an eight-month period in 2013 and 2014, he had three stays in the hospital of a week or longer.

Tarkanian was admitted to Valley on April 9 after returning from Dallas for the 2014 Final Four, where he had been a special guest of Kentucky coach John Calipari, whose team lost to Connecticut in the championship game. Tarkanian had suffered a heart attack and contracted pneumonia and spent 10 days in the hospital.

Tarkanian returned to Valley on Nov. 19 after contracting pneumonia. He was released Nov. 24, just in time to celebrate Thanksgiving with his family.

But he suffered a relapse in early December and was admitted to the hospital again, this time for a month before being released Jan. 7.

“He’s a fighter, he really is,” Lois Tarkanian said after her husband returned home following his lengthy stay.

Tarkanian’s death comes just four days after another legendary college basketball coach — North Carolina’s Smith — died after a lengthy illness on Saturday.

Tarkanian is survived by his wife, Lois, a Las Vegas councilwoman; daughters Pamela Tarkanian and Jodie Diamant; sons George and Danny; all of Las Vegas; a sister, Alice; a brother, Myron; both of Pasadena, Calif.; and 11 grandchildren.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 1:05 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS



Veteran “60 Minutes” correspondent Bob Simon was killed when his livery cab crashed on the West Side Highway in Manhattan Wednesday night, sources said.

The CBS reporter died when the Lincoln Town Car he was riding in crashed with a Mercedes and then lost control and plowed into a pedestrian expansion near 30th Street at about 7 p.m., according to sources.

Cops had to cut off the top of the Lincoln to free Simon and the driver, who, according to a law enforcement sources, was treated for a possible heart attack by EMTs.

The driver of the Mercedes said the livery driver was driving erratically.

“He swerved into me,” the driver said. “He hit me and he looked like he lost control of the car.”

Simon was taken to St.Luke’s where he died.
The former war correspondent joined 60 Minutes in 1996.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 2015 12:09 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

only us old fuckers will remember him....

'Laugh-In' announcer Gary Owens dead at 80



Gary Owens, the veteran voice-over artist with a rich baritone and a career that spanned various entertainment industries, has died.

He was 80.

Owens had been a diabetic since he was 8. He died Thursday surrounded by relatives at his Los Angeles area home, his son Chris Owens said.

"His body just kind of failed. We are grateful that he died so peacefully with all of us present and that he was able to remain vital throughout his life. I would like people to remember how good my father was. It would be hard to count how many times people approached my brother and I to tell us how much they loved working with my dad."

The veteran radio personality had been part of the entertainment industry since his teenage years, and will be remembered for his deep baritone and nuanced comedic timing.

Owens was the announcer on "Laugh-In," a sketch show starring Dan Rowan and Dick Martin. His list of accolades was not limited to one particular entertainment industry.

He hosted syndicated radio shows in a series of markets, and appeared on TV shows such as "Mad About You," "Sabrina, the Teenage Witch," "Roseanne" and "That '70s Show."

Owens was a busy man. He also wrote books and did commercial voice-overs and TV promo spots, his son said.

His voice-over work included notable series such as "America's Funniest Home Videos" and "Wonderful World of Disney."

He also appeared in 3,000 cartoons either as a narrator or a superhero, including Space Ghost and Batman, according to his family.

"He always said he was one of the luckiest men because ... he got to achieve everything he dreamed of," Chris Owens said.

"He got to work with greats like Bob Hope, Neil Simon -- all the great people he admired, including Walt Disney. Even his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame is right next to Walt Disney's."

In 1996, the South Dakota native was inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame in Washington, and the National Television Hall of Fame five years after that.

Owens is survived by his wife, Arleta Owens, and one other son, Scott Owens.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2015 5:50 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Television
Leonard Nimoy, Spock of ‘Star Trek,’ Dies at 83

By VIRGINIA HEFFERNANFEB. 27, 2015
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The Man Who Was Spock

Leonard Nimoy, best known for playing the character Spock in the Star Trek television shows and films, died at 83.
Video by Robin Lindsay on Publish Date February 27, 2015. Photo by NBC, via Photofest.
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Leonard Nimoy, the sonorous, gaunt-faced actor who won a worshipful global following as Mr. Spock, the resolutely logical human-alien first officer of the Starship Enterprise in the television and movie juggernaut “Star Trek,” died on Friday morning at his home in the Bel Air section of Los Angeles. He was 83.

His wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, confirmed his death, saying the cause was end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Mr. Nimoy announced that he had the disease last year, attributing it to years of smoking, a habit he had given up three decades earlier. He had been hospitalized earlier in the week.
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Leonard Nimoy at his 2010 one-person photography exhibition at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art in North Adams, Mass.
Leonard Nimoy Was Not (Only) SpockFEB. 27, 2015

His artistic pursuits — poetry, photography and music in addition to acting — ranged far beyond the United Federation of Planets, but it was as Mr. Spock that Mr. Nimoy became a folk hero, bringing to life one of the most indelible characters of the last half century: a cerebral, unflappable, pointy-eared Vulcan with a signature salute and blessing: “Live long and prosper” (from the Vulcan “Dif-tor heh smusma”).
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Play Video|3:23
Nimoy Explains Origin of Vulcan Greeting
Nimoy Explains Origin of Vulcan Greeting

As part of the Yiddish Book Center Wexler Oral History Project, Leonard Nimoy explains the origin of the Vulcan hand signal used by Dr. Spock, his character in the Star Trek series.
Video by Yiddish Book Center on Publish Date February 27, 2015. Photo by Yiddish Book Center’s Wexler Oral History Project.

Mr. Nimoy, who was teaching Method acting at his own studio when he was cast in the original “Star Trek” television series in the mid-1960s, relished playing outsiders, and he developed what he later admitted was a mystical identification with Spock, the lone alien on the starship’s bridge.

Yet he also acknowledged ambivalence about being tethered to the character, expressing it most plainly in the titles of two autobiographies: “I Am Not Spock,” published in 1977, and “I Am Spock,” published in 1995.

In the first, he wrote, “In Spock, I finally found the best of both worlds: to be widely accepted in public approval and yet be able to continue to play the insulated alien through the Vulcan character.”

“Star Trek,” which had its premiere on NBC on Sept. 8, 1966, made Mr. Nimoy a star. Gene Roddenberry, the creator of the franchise, called him “the conscience of ‘Star Trek’ ” — an often earnest, sometimes campy show that employed the distant future (as well as some primitive special effects by today’s standards) to take on social issues of the 1960s.

His stardom would endure. Though the series was canceled after three seasons because of low ratings, a cultlike following — the conference-holding, costume-wearing Trekkies, or Trekkers (the designation Mr. Nimoy preferred) — coalesced soon after “Star Trek” went into syndication.

The fans’ devotion only deepened when “Star Trek” was spun off into an animated show, various new series and an uneven parade of movies starring much of the original television cast, including — besides Mr. Nimoy — William Shatner (as Capt. James T. Kirk), DeForest Kelley (Dr. McCoy), George Takei (the helmsman, Sulu), James Doohan (the chief engineer, Scott), Nichelle Nichols (the chief communications officer, Uhura) and Walter Koenig (the navigator, Chekov).

When the director J. J. Abrams revived the “Star Trek” film franchise in 2009, with an all-new cast — including Zachary Quinto as Spock — he included a cameo part for Mr. Nimoy, as an older version of the same character. Mr. Nimoy also appeared in the 2013 follow-up, “Star Trek Into Darkness.”
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His zeal to entertain and enlighten reached beyond “Star Trek” and crossed genres. He had a starring role in the dramatic television series “Mission: Impossible” and frequently performed onstage, notably as Tevye in “Fiddler on the Roof.” His poetry was voluminous, and he published books of his photography.

He also directed movies, including two from the “Star Trek” franchise, and television shows. And he made records, singing pop songs as well as original songs about “Star Trek,” and gave spoken-word performances — to the delight of his fans and the bewilderment of critics.

But all that was subsidiary to Mr. Spock, the most complex member of the Enterprise crew, who was both one of the gang and a creature apart engaged at times in a lonely struggle with his warring racial halves.

In one of his most memorable “Star Trek” performances, Mr. Nimoy tried to follow in the tradition of two actors he admired, Charles Laughton and Boris Karloff, who each played a monstrous character — Quasimodo and the Frankenstein monster — who is transformed by love.

In Episode 24, which was first shown on March 2, 1967, Mr. Spock is indeed transformed. Under the influence of aphrodisiacal spores he discovers on the planet Omicron Ceti III, he lets free his human side and announces his love for Leila Kalomi (Jill Ireland), a woman he had once known on Earth. In this episode, Mr. Nimoy brought to Spock’s metamorphosis not only warmth and compassion, but also a rarefied concept of alienation.

“I am what I am, Leila,” Mr. Spock declared. “And if there are self-made purgatories, then we all have to live in them. Mine can be no worse than someone else’s.”

Born in Boston on March 26, 1931, Leonard Simon Nimoy was the second son of Max and Dora Nimoy, Ukrainian immigrants and Orthodox Jews. His father worked as a barber.

From the age of 8, Leonard acted in local productions, winning parts at a community college, where he performed through his high school years. In 1949, after taking a summer course at Boston College, he traveled to Hollywood, though it wasn’t until 1951 that he landed small parts in two movies, “Queen for a Day” and “Rhubarb.”
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Leonard Nimoy Dies at 83
Leonard Nimoy Dies at 83

CreditJerry Mosey/Associated Press

He continued to be cast in little-known movies, although he did presciently play an alien invader in a cult serial called “Zombies of the Stratosphere,” and in 1961 he had a minor role on an episode of “The Twilight Zone.” His first starring movie role came in 1952 with “Kid Monk Baroni,” in which he played a disfigured Italian street-gang leader who becomes a boxer.

Mr. Nimoy served in the Army for two years, rising to sergeant and spending 18 months at Fort McPherson in Georgia, where he presided over shows for the Army’s Special Services branch. He also directed and starred as Stanley in the Atlanta Theater Guild’s production of “A Streetcar Named Desire” before receiving his final discharge in November 1955.

He then returned to California, where he worked as a soda jerk, movie usher and cabdriver while studying acting at the Pasadena Playhouse. He achieved wide visibility in the late 1950s and early 1960s on television shows like “Wagon Train,” “Rawhide” and “Perry Mason.” Then came “Star Trek.”

Mr. Nimoy returned to college in his 40s and earned a master’s degree in Spanish from Antioch University Austin, an affiliate of Antioch College in Ohio, in 1978. Antioch College later awarded Mr. Nimoy an honorary doctorate.

Mr. Nimoy directed two of the Star Trek movies, “Star Trek III: The Search for Spock” (1984) and “Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home” (1986), which he helped write. In 1991, the same year that he resurrected Mr. Spock on two episodes of “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” Mr. Nimoy was also the executive producer and a writer of the movie “Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country.”


I guess Mr Spock wanted Mr. Nimoy to join his explorations of other universes. They both will truly be missed. Thank you, Mr Nimoy for...
Dusty Chaps


It's strange that people seem in great numbers to be dying in their early 80s. With all the money in the world and access to the best...
Alberto
Just now

I met him at a book signing at Barnes&Noble in Midtown, about twenty years ago, where I went because I cared about several of the messages...



He then directed the hugely successful comedy “Three Men and a Baby” (1987), a far cry from his science-fiction work, and appeared in made-for-television movies. He received an Emmy nomination for the 1982 movie “A Woman Called Golda,” in which he portrayed the husband of Golda Meir, the prime minister of Israel, who was played by Ingrid Bergman. It was the fourth Emmy nomination of his career — the other three were for his “Star Trek” work — although he never won.

Mr. Nimoy’s marriage to the actress Sandi Zober ended in divorce. Besides his wife, he is survived by his children, Adam and Julie Nimoy; a stepson, Aaron Bay Schuck; and six grandchildren; one great-grandchild, and an older brother, Melvin.

Though his speaking voice was among his chief assets as an actor, the critical consensus was that his music was mortifying. Mr. Nimoy, however, was undaunted, and his fans seemed to enjoy the camp of his covers of songs like “If I Had a Hammer.” (His first album was called “Leonard Nimoy Presents Mr. Spock’s Music From Outer Space.”)

From 1995 to 2003, Mr. Nimoy narrated the “Ancient Mysteries” series on the History Channel. He also appeared in commercials, including two with Mr. Shatner for Priceline.com. He provided the voice for animated characters in “Transformers: The Movie,” in 1986, and “The Pagemaster,” in 1994.

In 2001 he voiced the king of Atlantis in the Disney animated movie “Atlantis: The Lost Empire,” and in 2005 he furnished voice-overs for the computer game Civilization IV. More recently, he had a recurring role on the science-fiction series “Fringe” and was heard, as the voice of Spock, in an episode of the hit sitcom “The Big Bang Theory.”

Mr. Nimoy was an active supporter of the arts as well. The Thalia, a venerable movie theater on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, now a multi-use hall that is part of Symphony Space, was renamed the Leonard Nimoy Thalia in 2002.

He also found his voice as a writer. Besides his autobiographies, he published “A Lifetime of Love: Poems on the Passages of Life” in 2002. Typical of Mr. Nimoy’s simple free verse are these lines: “In my heart/Is the seed of the tree/Which will be me.”

In later years, he rediscovered his Jewish heritage, and in 1991 he produced and starred in “Never Forget,” a television movie based on the story of a Holocaust survivor who sued a neo-Nazi organization of Holocaust deniers.

In 2002, having illustrated his books of poetry with his photographs, Mr. Nimoy published “Shekhina,” a book devoted to photography with a Jewish theme, that of the feminine aspect of God. His black-and-white photographs of nude and seminude women struck some Orthodox Jewish leaders as heretical, but Mr. Nimoy asserted that his work was consistent with the teaching of the kabbalah.

His religious upbringing also influenced the characterization of Spock. The character’s split-fingered salute, he often explained, had been his idea: He based it on the kohanic blessing, a manual approximation of the Hebrew letter shin, which is the first letter in Shaddai, one of the Hebrew names for God.

“To this day, I sense Vulcan speech patterns, Vulcan social attitudes and even Vulcan patterns of logic and emotional suppression in my behavior,” Mr. Nimoy wrote years after the original series ended.

But that wasn’t such a bad thing, he discovered. “Given the choice,” he wrote, “if I had to be someone else, I would be Spock.”

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 7:36 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

live long and prosper!
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2015 10:29 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

hey brothers! please if I may cause don't know if right place,but this another sad day in poi life:

in year 2000 one day my wife (who in 1997 was diagnosed with a disease) along with my daughter wanted to go to humane society to maybe get a dog.i said in no way do i want one.not because I don't like them,but only because when I was young I had 2 of them in my family.I got older and I remember how sad my mom was when she had to let those dogs go.sure poi sad but got over I guess quickly though I think of them.


my wife that day said hey let's just look we don't have to get one.I think this was more for my daughter.now if you can relate you know how it is as parents.kids want pets guinea pigs,fish or whatever etc.and maybe cause my daughter only child.well you know how goes guess who has to take care of them when maybe child lose interest.


so we go to the humane society,and poi kinda showing no interest.my wife and daughter looking at dogs all small ones way over to one side.again poi wants no part of this (yeh right).next thing I know at the bigger dogs cage were I was there was a big commotion because other dogs were getting fed.


I looked and all of a sudden I was wondering why this smaller dog who was in a bigger pen with like 4 other big dogs were in same place.the bigger dogs were picking on this smaller dog to get attention,and food first,but this smaller dog who was built but little scrawny.when I went closer to pen bigger dog went after this smaller dog again.smaller dog went after bigger dogs balls not backing down.


now I saw this and 1st thing I did was called my wife and daughter over to see this dog.she little bigger than what they were looking for so you know compromise cause if poi get dog he want no rat dog!


they came over,and we talked,and guess what they said lets see the dog in private.by the way the dog had pretty markings,and cute,

they bring her over to a private pen with us 3.the dog was so great with us we fell in love.yeh poi who didn't want a dog.great markings tuff but frickin cute.the people at humane society said she was half pitbull,and hound though later I thought maybe half pitbull or beagle which makes sense cause in hawaii they use these types to hunt pigs in forest (they told us she was a stray).


so guess what dog comes home to our family.yeh me the one who didn't want one.


the dog was so protective of my girls (my wife,and daughter) remember now my wife is sick,and when she had a hard time taking care of my daughter this dog was always there.at times when I got sick for awhile this dog never left our sides.I mean even if she knew you you had a hard time even coming into our house.she backed down only if my wife,daughter or myself said it was ok. this gave me big relief when I was at work to know this.

my wife passed away and left us in 2007.hard times! I would be at work.my daughter would come home from school before poi got off work,but never worried cause felt sense of relief.

my daughter after 2 years in college here wanted to move on to finish college in washington.so poi along with this dog moved on to another place just me and her. when my pops was staying with me before he passed in 2014 this dog watched over him keeping him company when i was at work to.

today on 4/17/2015 I had to let this special dog go.she had to be put to sleep cause she was 16 years old maybe 17.I write this with tears in my eyes.I am in my place still thinking she is here thinking about her alot, sorry I have no picture to post,but I look at her picture in my room while I tell you this.

this special dog her name is Haleiwa Lani Girl and I will miss her so much along with my wife and father.

RIP my princess you are with my wife now,and will see you soon someday.


:..(
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2015 1:05 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

rip Haleiwa Lani Girl

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PostPosted: Fri May 15, 2015 12:36 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Blues legend B.B. King dies at age 89 in Las Vegas



The Mississippi native's reign as "king of the blues" lasted more than six decades and straddled two centuries, influencing a generation of rock and blues musicians, from Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan, to Sheryl Crow and John Mayer.

His life was the subject of the documentary "B.B. King: The Life of Riley," and the inspiration for the The B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center, which opened in 2008.

King's enduring legacy came from his refusal to slow down even after cementing his status as an American music icon.

Even with a long list of honors to his name -- Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction, Presidential Medal of Freedom -- he maintained a relentless touring schedule well into his 80s.

Throughout his career, King evolved with the times to incorporate contemporary trends and influences without straying from his Delta blues roots. Whether he was sharing the stage with U2 on "When Loves Comes to Town" -- a scene memorialized in the 1988 concert film, "Rattle and Hum" -- or playing in the East Room of the White House with Buddy Guy, Mick Jagger, Jeff Beck and others, King's single-string guitar notes trilled with an unmistakable vibrato from his hollow-bodied Gibson affectionately known as Lucille.

Slowing down

King finally started showing signs of his age last year after decades of living with Type II diabetes.

A shaky show in St. Louis prompted his reps to issue an apology for "a performance that did not match Mr. King's usual standard of excellence." He fell ill in October after a show at Chicago's House of Blues due to dehydration and exhaustion, prompting a rare cancellation of the remainder of his tour.

He was hospitalized for dehydration April in Las Vegas, a long way from his modest roots as the son of a sharecropper.

King was born on September 16, 1925, on a cotton plantation between Indianola and what is now Itta Bena, Mississippi. He sang with church choirs as a child and learned basic guitar chords from his uncle, a preacher. In his youth, he played on street corners for dimes, saying he earned more in one night singing on the corner than he did in one week working in the cotton field.

Beale Street Blues Boy

He enlisted in the Army during World War II but was released because he drove a tractor, an essential homefront occupation.

In 1947, he hitchhiked to Memphis, Tennessee, home to a thriving music scene that supported aspiring black performers. He stayed with his cousin Bukka White, one of the most celebrated blues performers of his time, who schooled King further in the art of the blues.

King took the Beale Street Blues Boy, or BB for short, as a disc jockey for radio station WDIA/AM Memphis.

He got his first big break in 1948 by performing on Sonny Boy Williamson's radio program out of West Memphis, leading to steady engagements at the Sixteenth Avenue Grill in West Memphis, and a 10-minute spot on WDIA.

As "King's Spot" grew in popularity on WDIA, King shortened "Beale Street Blues Boy" to "Blues Boy King," and eventually B.B. King.

His ascent continued in 1949 with his first recordings, "Miss Martha King/Take a Swing with Me" and "How Do You Feel When Your Baby Packs Up and Goes/I've Got the Blues." His first hit record "Three O'clock Blues" was released in 1951 and stayed on the top of the charts for four months.

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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2015 8:04 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

[youtube]watch?v=4fk2prKnYnI[/youtube] Hat tip rip mr.blues!
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PostPosted: Sun May 17, 2015 11:47 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Garo Yepremian June 2, 1944 – May 15, 2015


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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2015 5:12 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

oh shit ronnie.. i got a funny story... old friend of my dads was a guy they called little tommy... looked just like garo and was an armenian also.... anways.. back in early 80's there was tommy, my dad and i, coming home from SF... we went to pick up some coke.. i think it was like 4 ounces or something.. anyways.. the 3 of us were pretty coked out and he gets pulled over from the CHP... he told the cops he didnt have his ID on him and told the guy he was garo .... the cop was a big fan and let us go.... it was the craziest shit ever.. i thought for sure we were all going to jail after he told the cop that...

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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2015 2:47 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Funny how the smallest thing can bring back a memory, and just like that you're remembering something from 30 years ago. Good story. Lucky break, too!

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2015 1:40 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

MEADOWLARK LEMON April 25, 1932 - December 27, 2015



(CNN) George "Meadowlark" Lemon, the basketball star who entertained millions of fans around the world with his antics as a longtime member of the Harlem Globetrotters, died Sunday in Scottsdale, Arizona. He was 83.

Lemon played 24 seasons and by his own estimate more than 16,000 games with the Globetrotters, the touring exhibition basketball team known for its slick ball-handling, practical jokes, red-white-and-blue uniforms and multiyear winning streaks against overmatched opponents.

He also was one of a handful of Globetrotters whose fame transcended sports, especially among children during the team's heyday in the 1960s and 1970s. Lemon was immortalized in a Harlem Globetrotters cartoon series and appeared on "The Ed Sullivan Show," episodes of "Scooby Doo" and many national TV commercials.

A gifted player whose basketball skills were sometimes overshadowed by his on-court high jinks, Lemon was known for sinking half-court hook shots, throwing behind-the-back passes and pretending to spy on his opponents' huddles.

Nicknamed the "clown prince" of basketball, he also pioneered a trademark routine in which he doused a referee with a bucket of water and then pranked fans by heaving another bucket -- filled with confetti, not water -- into the stands as people scrambled to get out of the way.

"He made the young and the young at heart laugh. The guy was just unparalleled," said TyRone "Hollywood" Brown, who played for the Globetrotters from 1985-1996 and later played for Lemon's teams. "In all my years I've never seen another showman come near him."

Brown said he had a phone conversation with Lemon on Christmas Eve and that his former teammate sounded in good health. Lemon was trying to interest movie producers in making a feature film about his life, Brown said.

"I'm just honored that I had the opportunity to ... have him as a mentor and play on the same court with him," Brown told CNN.

Born in Wilmington, North Carolina, Lemon joined the Globetrotters in 1954 after serving two years in the Army. Over the next quarter-century, he and the team played almost everywhere, from high school gyms to Madison Square Garden to an exhibition in Moscow during the Cold War.

His website says Lemon and his teammates played before popes, kings, queens, presidents and regular basketball fans in almost 100 countries.

After a salary dispute, Lemon left the Globetrotters in 1979 to form his own comedic basketball teams, which performed under the names Meadowlark Lemon's Bucketeers, the Shooting Stars and Meadowlark Lemon's Harlem All Stars.

He returned to the Harlem Globetrotters for a 50-game "comeback" tour in 1993.

"For a generation of fans, the name Meadowlark Lemon was synonymous with the Harlem Globetrotters," Globetrotters CEO Kurt Schneider said. "He was an incredible entertainer and brought happiness and lifelong memories to millions around the world. We have lost a great ambassador of the game."

Lemon was enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2003. He spent the last several years of his life serving as an ordained minister and motivational speaker.

His death follows that of early Globetrotter player and teammate Marques Haynes, who died in May.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2015 4:32 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

"who would win a wrestling match between Lemmy and God...?"
"that's a trick question because Lemmy IS God..."


not sure why i cant this video to embed - so fuck it heres the link



[youtube]ueeEEXE7Po8[/youtube]



RIP Lemmy

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 10:59 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

JOE GARAGIOLA Feb 12 1936 - March 23 2016


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2016 2:00 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

MERLE HAGGARD April 6, 1937 - April 6, 2016

[youtube]KDDyyDjWM_0[/youtube]

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2016 8:12 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

[youtube]watch?v=eP5O_0K89o8[/youtube]
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2016 6:33 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

RIP Prince
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2016 2:06 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

MUHAMMAD ALI January 17, 1942 - June 3, 2016



One of the most recognizable photos in the world.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2016 2:22 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

James David "Buddy" Ryan February 17, 1934 - June 28, 2016


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 17, 2016 1:41 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

NATHANIEL "NATE" THURMOND July 25, 1941 - July 16, 2016



A genial giant of a man, Nate Thurmond was one of the all-time great NBA centers, with a rugged, in-your-face style of play that frequently intimidated even Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Wilt Chamberlain. The Hall of Famer played 14 professional seasons in the 1960s and 1970s, posting career averages of 15.0 points and 15.0 rebounds per game. Among the all-time NBA leaders in career rebounds and rebounding average, Thurmond was selected to play in seven NBA All-Star Games and was selected to the NBA All-Defensive First or Second Team five times. He still holds the NBA record for most rebounds in a quarter with 18, and he owns the distinction of being the first player ever to record a quadruple-double.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 4:06 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

ARA PARSEGHIAN (May 21, 1923 – August 2, 2017)



CLICK HERE

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 10:50 pm    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Antoine "Fats" Domino, Jr. (February 26, 1928 – October 24, 2017)

[youtube]-j75b21FqkM[/youtube]

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 9:22 am    Post subject: Re: OBITS

Malcolm Young, guitarist and co-founder of AC/DC, died Saturday at the age of 64. Young had been suffering with dementia for the past three years, an illness that forced his retirement from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame-inducted band he founded with his brother Angus Young in 1973.

"Renowned for his musical prowess, Malcolm was a songwriter, guitarist, performer, producer and visionary who inspired many," the statement said. "From the outset, he knew what he wanted to achieve and, along with his younger brother, took to the world stage giving their all at every show. Nothing less would do for their fans."

As rhythm guitarist for the legendary rock band, Malcolm Young served as an indispensable foil to Angus Young's arena-stuffing riffs. After forming AC/DC in 1973, the Young brothers would be credited as co-writers on every song the band recorded from their 1975 debut High Voltage through 2014's Rock or Bust. That final album marked AC/DC's first without Malcolm, who announced in September 2014 that he would permanently leave the band due to dementia.
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